acceptance

Buck Angel's picture

Buck Angel's Family Acceptance PSA

My new Public Service Announcement from my Mom. To help family members who are having a hard time with acceptance of a GBLTQ son or daughter.

For help, check out the resources on http://www.pflag.org

closed captioned for the hearing impaired

Check out more of Buck Angel Entertainment at www.buckangelentertainment.com

arvan's picture

Announcing the Riot 2011 National Conversation Series: Who’s in Charge?

2011 National Conversation Series: Who’s in Charge?

May 3, 2011
June 7, 2011
July 12, 2011

Each 90-minute discussion begins Tuesdays at 2:00 pm Eastern

The Riot’s 2011 National Conversation series provides a forum for self-advocate leaders to talk about:
• What gets in the way of people being in charge of their own lives and support that helps people be in control (May 3rd)
• What gets in the way of self-advocates being in charge of their own movement and support that is helpful (June 7th)
• Ideas about what self-advocate leaders and others can do to strengthen the movement (July 12th)

Speaker List

Sharon Lewis – ADD Commissioner
Ari Ne’eman – ASAN
Beth Davis – self-advocate, Illinois
Betty Williams – SABE president, Indiana
Chester Finn – self-advocate, New York
Gayle B. Gardner – self-advocate, Oregon
Kate Fialkowski – Kennedy Policy Fellow, ADD
Katie Arnold – Sibling Leadership Network, Illinois
Sam Durbin – self-advocate, California
Stacey Milbern – NYLN, North Carolina
Steve Holmes – advisor SANYS, New York
Jennifer Knapp – advisor, Illinios

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER!

ADD (the US Administration on Developmental Disabilities) is currently hosting five regional summits to discover what is happening with self-advocacy across the country and develop recommendations for action to strengthen the movement at the state and national levels. Self-advocate leaders from up to 30 states are attending to speak up about the movement in their states.

The Riot wants to hear from self-advocate leaders in all 50 states, Canada, and elsewhere about the self-advocacy movement in your state. Self-advocate leaders everywhere are invited to participate in the Riot 2011 National Conversation series to speak up about Who’s in charge!

Buck Angel's picture

Buck Angel: It Gets Better

A video I made for Dan Savage's "It Gets Better" Project on YouTube.  Reaching out to GBLTQ kids on how life will get better.  I had a pretty messed up time as a kid.  But I made it to become the man I am today.  I wanted to share with you a part of my life that is sad but I made it!  You can too.

Please if you have the time contribute to this cause!  We should all be apart of helping out youth grow up to be happy individuals!  We all deserve that much.

Thank You Dan Savage!

More on the project here.

Help is here:
http://www.thetrevorproject.org/
http://www.scarleteen.com/
http://wearetheyouth.org/

Please email me here buckangel@buckangelentertainment.com

arvan's picture

Sex Verification in Sport

(From OII)

The science and management of sex verification in sport.

R Tucker, M Collins, South African Journal of Sports Medicine. ISSN: 1015-5163

Abstract:

http://ajol.info/index.php/sasma/article/view/50506/0

The verification of gender eligibility in sporting competition poses a biological and management challenge for sports science and medicine, as well as for sporting authorities. It has been established that in most sporting events, the strength and power advantage possessed by males as a result of the virilising action of hormones such as testosterone produce significant advantages in performance. For this reason, males and females compete largely in separate gender categories.

Controversies arise as a result of intersex conditions, where the classification of individuals into male or female is complex. The present review provides the historical context to the debate, identifying the origins of gender verification as a means to deter cheating. It describes how various testing methods have been attempted, including physical examinations of genitalia, molecular techniques including genetic screening, and complex multidisciplinary approaches including endocrinological, genetic and gynaecological examination. To date, none appear to have provided a satisfactory resolution to the problem, and appear instead to have unfairly discriminated against individuals as a result of inappropriate application of testing results.

Sporting authorities have formulated position stands for the management of such cases, but there is not absolute agreement between them and little evidence to support whether intersex individuals should or should not be allowed to compete in female categories.

Full Text: PDF
http://ajol.info/index.php/sasma/article/viewFile/50506/39186

Editorial Comment:

This article highlights the problems sports officials create for themselves when they attempt to determine an athlete’s sex from a binary perspective.

The mythical Adam and Eve model of biological sex comes crashing down in the face of medicine’s inability to develop a definitive method of sex determination.

It is time sports bodies such as the IOC and the IAAF accepted that natural variations in biological sex are no different than variations in race, ethnicity or for that matter, height or hair colour.

In some spheres of human endeavour, some individuals have natural advantages over others. Natural advantage plus hard work and training create winners. Its called competition and its what sporting events are for and why athletes participate. We think Administrators should allow them get on with it, finding other ways to sniff out drugs cheats, without destroying the lives of innocent athletes.

arvan's picture

Call for Abstracts and Presentations on Body Image and Body Politics

Breaking Boundaries:
Body Politics and the Dynamics of Difference


a Women's History Conference at Sarah Lawrence College
Bronxville, New York
March 4-5, 2011
Free and Open to the Public

Keynote Speaker:

Marilyn Wann
Fat Activist and Author of Fat!So?

When it comes to “the body,” the definition of normal is fluid and changes across cultures and time. In each context, there are those who have been exploited and oppressed because they do not fit prevailing notions of beauty. This conference will explore the body politics around those with “deviant” bodies.

This conference will address these and other questions:

What are the dominant narratives and perceptions about beauty and bodies?

How do these perceptions affect public policy around issues of health, civil rights, education, and accessibility?

How do those whose bodies do not fit into the “proper” cultural norms challenge attitudes, laws and perceptions? 

How have they negotiated for and found power in unwelcoming environments, both now and in the past?

How do the categories of race, class, gender, sexuality, age and disability complicate prevailing ideas about embodiment? 

Are there and have there been communities and cultures that have welcomed those whose bodies are currently perceived as deviant in dominant popular discourse?

And, what is the relationship between promoting and continuing the dominant discourse and capitalist consumer culture?

We invite activists, scholars and artists in all fields to propose papers, panels, workshops, performances, and exhibits. Proposals for panels are especially welcomed, but individual papers will also be considered.

Specific topics may include, but are not limited to:

Representations of deviant bodies in popular culture
Social justice and fat and disability activism
Intersectionality:  race, gender, class, sexuality and the body
HAES: Health at Every Size
Stigma
Feminism and the body
Social construction of disability
Objectification and commodification of the deviant body
Fiction and the deviant body
Language and the body
Deviant bodies across cultures and time

Please email a brief abstract and c.v./resume to:

Tara James
Women’s History Graduate Program
Sarah Lawrence College
Bronxville, NY 10708
Email: tjames@sarahlawrence.edu
Phone: 914-395-2405

Deadline December, 3 2010

arvan's picture

Meeting my Dad as his Daughter (trans woman) - Personal Vlog by ladyVixion

ladyVixion is one of the most touching, open and honest people I've come across.  In this personal vlog entry, she describes her experience in meeting her father for the first time in person, since she came out as trans to him. 

With all the crap going on in this world, the beauty of human relatedness and the example of how we can profoundly impact each other - is cause for hope, strength and courage.

-arvan

arvan's picture

A wonderful video by ladyVixion about coming out trans to her father.

ladyVixion is one of my favorite vloggers.  She has made plenty of sassy, humorous and thoughtful work already.  In the middle of that, she told this honest, poignant and human piece about family, self, identity and dignity.  I hope you enjoy it as much as I do.

I came out to my father that I am Transexual - by ladyVixion:

Clarisse Thorn's picture

Defending my irresponsible, abusive, gender-stereotypical coming-out story

Defending my irresponsible, abusive, gender-stereotypical coming-out story

Note: this post is a bit feminist-theoretical.

I try to think seriously about about all comments on my work, but I usually just brush off the snide ones. Every once in a while, though, one arrows through and hits me where I'm vulnerable and shakes my confidence, and if it's nastily phrased, then it hurts all the more. Seeps into me like poison.

Yep, this is another post about my S&M coming-out story, published in February by "Time Out Chicago". (I've received some questions about when I'm going to start officially blogging for "Time Out" -- the answer is that we're still negotiating the terms of my blogging contract and I'm not sure when we'll be done. I think we both really want this professional blogging gig to happen, so I'm confident that we'll work it out, but it might take a while.)

Here's a brief one-paragraph synopsis: my coming-out story talks about how I got drunk with a man named Richard at a party when I was 20; he started hurting me intensely; and I really got into it. I'd known a little bit about the existence of BDSM for a while -- had experimented with light BDSM before, in fact -- but this experience was much more intense, and in particular led me to the realization that I needed very dark and tearful masochistic encounters. As an independent, rational feminist, it was difficult for me to come to terms with my desires. It didn't help that Richard and I weren't well-suited romantically, although we were well-suited on an S&M level. Adjusting took a long time; but after seeing a Kink Aware therapist, coming out to my parents, exploring BDSM on my own terms, and having BDSM relationships with non-Richard men who suited me better romantically, I feel pretty much at peace with my BDSM identity.

arvan's picture

India’s first transgender beauty queens

By Jayeeta Mazumder, Hindustan Times

It was very different from the usual beauty contests… minus the skin show, the choreographed ramp walk or the presence of the glitzy fashion world. The contestants were judged on the basis of talent, confidence… and comfort level with their sexuality. Yes, it’s the first-ever beauty pageant for the transgender community in India.

The Indian Super Queen pageant concluded in Mumbai recently, after a month-long audition in 10 cities and intense grooming sessions. The four finalists are Bobby Laishram, Rani Botara, Arpan Banerjee and Ritu Bawgi.

The brain behind the event, Laxminarayan Tripathi, was the first transgender to represent Asia Pacific in the UN General Assembly President’s office as a Civil Society Task Force member. A founder member of the first Hijra/Transgenders organisation in India and South East Asia, Tripathy says, “Although what I started was considered ‘different’, many people said that I was doing it for publicity. But I never gave up.” She admitted that all the contestants were extremely eager to learn. Most of them would love to participate in mainstream beauty contests if given an opportunity.

The semi finalists had to clear three rounds — the ramp walk, talent showcase round and a Q ‘n’ A to bag the crown and prize money of Rs 10 lakh. Judged by gay rights activist Celina Jaitly and actor Zeenat Aman, the two runners-up won prizes of Rs 8 lakh and 5 lakh, respectively. “We are planning to make it an annual event. Hope we continue getting the support,” Tripathy said.

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