announcement

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Call for Submissions: Here Come the Brides! The Brave New World of Lesbian Marriage

Call for Submissions: Here Come the Brides! The Brave New World of Lesbian Marriage (Seal Press, 2012)

2,000-4,000 words

Editors: Audrey Bilger and Michele Kort. Audrey Bilger is the Faculty Director of the Writing Center and Associate  Professor of Literature at Claremont McKenna College. Michele Kort is Senior Editor at Ms. magazine, a freelance writer, and author of three books (including Soul Picnic: The Music and Passion of Laura Nyro).

Same-sex marriage is obviously a hot topic these days, and we want to look specifically at the lesbian side of the equation. Given the secondary status of women throughout much of the globe, bonds between women—particularly intimate connections—can redefine the political landscape as well as the domestic realm. Anna and Eve don’t get as much press as Adam and Steve, but they’re potentially more threatening to the status quo.

Here Come the Brides will primarily cover legal marriages, but also lesbian commitment ceremonies in locales where the legal status of gay marriage is still up for grabs. We hope the book will be able to represent a diversity of points of view in terms of race, class, ethnicity and geography, and incorporate transgender perspectives. Although the book will be generally upbeat about lesbian marriage, we’d also like viewpoints from those who are opposed to either being married themselves or who have issues with the institution or the politics of same-sex marriage.

We’re looking for a variety of material: primarily first-person essays, but also secondhand observations, bridesmaid/mother-of-the-bride/etc. stories, and even analytical pieces (as long as they’re written in an accessible style). We’re open to graphic essays/cartoons as well, and we’re eager to see lesbian wedding ephemera: great photos, invitations, newspaper wedding announcements, vows, guest favors.

Needless to say, we’re looking for terrific writing—colorful, moving, funny, surprising, insightful. We can imagine essays that cover a lesbian marriage from soup to nuts, but we think it’s more likely, given the word limitation, that it might be best to focus on a certain aspect of lesbian marriage or of your particular wedding—at least as an organizing principle.

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Call for papers – Piracy as activism

Online journal Re-public invites contributions for its upcoming special issue titled “Piracy as activism”. In spite of its long and intense presence in the popular imagery, piracy is a concept that has only scarcely and timidly been linked to forms of political activism. Mostly seen through the lens of criminalisation and policing (including also the transgression of the existing order by the heroic pirates) piracy has rarely been analysed in relation to its influence in shaping the everyday life of contemporary communities.

Piracy, in the seas or lands or digital networks, encompasses a wide array of practices that shape, and often transform, these spaces and networks. Apart from this constitutive power, pirate practices also challenge the formal organisation of spaces and networks, by projecting and instituting alternative mobilities, hierarchies, boundaries, and social relations.

This special issue aims to explore pirate practices and subjectivities in terms of their resistance to the dominant organisations of everyday life. Possible topics might include:

  • Piracy and the control of digital networks
  • Pirate networks, pirate markets and the transformation of urban space
  • Production, labour and the pirating of copyright, patents, and trademarks
  • Piracy and the administration of space
  • Pirate economies and the globalisation of capitalism

Essays should be approximately 1,500 – 1,800 words.

Please submit contributions in any electronic format to

e-mail: editors@re-public.gr

Deadline for submissions: 15 December 2010

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Announcing! LOVED BODIES, BIG IDEAS Contest

Tired of talktalktalking about how toxic our culture is for girls and women, particularly in relation to their bodies?  Craving to take action?  Brimming with good ideas but suffering from a lack of support?  Then this is your moment.

The Women’s Therapy Centre Institute is thrilled to announce the LOVED BODIES, BIG IDEAS Contest.

We need your BIG IDEA in response to the following question:

What is one bold action that could make the world truly value

the diversity of women and girls’ bodies?

All of the BIG IDEAS will be considered by a team of expert judges and the three most thrilling and original ones will be chosen as winners. These winners will be invited to present their ideas in 10-minute presentations at the Endangered Species Summit in March of 2011 in New York City in front of a power-packed audience of media representatives, philanthropists, public intellectuals, activists, therapists, and more. It is our hope that the energy in the room will propel these ideas into real, bonafide action!

All travel and accommodations for the three BIG IDEAS winners will be covered by the Women’s Therapy Centre Institute.

Note: if you don’t win, your idea will not go to waste! All of the BIG IDEAS submitted will be included in our online idea gallery as a resource for body image advocates across the world.

To submit to the contest, please email a 500 word (maximum) BIG IDEA essay to Contest Manager, Shirley Kailas: shirley.kailas@gmail.com by December 1, 2010, 6:00 pm.  Please include your name, age, email, phone #, and any organizational affiliation you have on the top of the page.

A few examples of the kinds of BIG IDEAS we’re hoping for include: A nationally-recognized curriculum on body image, disordered eating and exercise, and the limits of the BMI measurement for medical schools, legislation on body toxic advertising during television targeted at children and teens, or a campaign to end diet commercials on a show primarily targeting women.

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Talking About the Taboo: 2nd CSPH Annual Conference

CSPH 2nd Annual Conference

October 10th

1:00-5:00 Pm

Yes, folks, it’s that time of year again, The Center for Sexual Pleasure and Health welcomes you to our 2nd annual conference, “Talking About the Taboo, Discussing Difficult Issues in Human Sexuality.”

For the first time ever, The CSPH will provide sexuality education to adults in a safe and open environment. By bringing together all aspects of sexuality, the pleasure, education, advocacy and medical worlds, we hope to take subjects that are traditionally “taboo” and elucidate them, showing that the taboo can be fun, interesting and educational and most importantly, able to be discussed in thoughtful, provoking ways.

Talk to an Expert:

“Talking About the Taboo” will feature many sexuality experts willing to share with you their work in the field of sexuality. From medical providers, rape crisis counselors, to dominatrixes, you are sure to find someone to teach you something new! Listen to our panel, take a small group class or chat it up with our experts throughout the event.

Play with a Toy:

Check out our vendors, who will be showing off the latest and greatest in sexual aids. These top of the line, 100% safe toys and products can help to enhance your sex life in many ways.

Hear our Panel:

This year’s conference brings us some of the most noteworthy participants in the realm of sexuality. Be sure to stick around for what is sure to be an informative and lively panel addressing current issues surrounding sexuality. Our guest panelists will include:

Dr. Charlie Glickman,

Princess Kali,

Audacia Ray,

Sinclair Sexsmith,

Dr. Logan Levkoff

Anita Hoffner

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Spark Summit - Challenging the Sexualization of Girls

Friday, October 22 · 12:00am - 11:30pm

New York, NY- Hunter College

On the heels of APA’s task force report that found the sexualization of girls so pervasive that “virtually every media form studied provides ample evidence,” a coalition of organizations is taking action.

SPARK stands for Sexualization Protest: Action, Rebellion, Knowledge

Current SPARK partners include:

Women's Media Center
Hardy Girls Healthy Women
TrueChild
Ms. Foundation
ASAP Initiative at Hunter College/CUNY

The SPARK Summit will bring together girls and media professionals, thought leaders and funders, researchers and activists – and will serve as a national call to action and campaign for change.  As a first step towards building a broader coalition, a convening was held in May, thanks to generous funding from the NoVo Foundation. Participants included the Ford Foundation, Girls Inc, the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media, and the APA, which will be a part of the summit’s policy/research committee.

Who: girls, girl-serving organizations, activists, media professionals, researchers, funders, thought leaders and allies

The SPARK summit is an exciting day-long event with the purpose of igniting a movement for girls' rights. Participants will have the opportunity to speak out, push back on the sexualization of girls, learn, and have fun with one another!

An interactive website is being developed for participants to take action in the months leading up to the summit.

If you are interested in partnering with us, supporting our work, or promoting the summit, please email SPARKsummit@gmail.com

For updates, follow the summit on Twitter: @SPARKsummit.

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Call for Abstracts and Presentations on Body Image and Body Politics

Breaking Boundaries:
Body Politics and the Dynamics of Difference


a Women's History Conference at Sarah Lawrence College
Bronxville, New York
March 4-5, 2011
Free and Open to the Public

Keynote Speaker:

Marilyn Wann
Fat Activist and Author of Fat!So?

When it comes to “the body,” the definition of normal is fluid and changes across cultures and time. In each context, there are those who have been exploited and oppressed because they do not fit prevailing notions of beauty. This conference will explore the body politics around those with “deviant” bodies.

This conference will address these and other questions:

What are the dominant narratives and perceptions about beauty and bodies?

How do these perceptions affect public policy around issues of health, civil rights, education, and accessibility?

How do those whose bodies do not fit into the “proper” cultural norms challenge attitudes, laws and perceptions? 

How have they negotiated for and found power in unwelcoming environments, both now and in the past?

How do the categories of race, class, gender, sexuality, age and disability complicate prevailing ideas about embodiment? 

Are there and have there been communities and cultures that have welcomed those whose bodies are currently perceived as deviant in dominant popular discourse?

And, what is the relationship between promoting and continuing the dominant discourse and capitalist consumer culture?

We invite activists, scholars and artists in all fields to propose papers, panels, workshops, performances, and exhibits. Proposals for panels are especially welcomed, but individual papers will also be considered.

Specific topics may include, but are not limited to:

Representations of deviant bodies in popular culture
Social justice and fat and disability activism
Intersectionality:  race, gender, class, sexuality and the body
HAES: Health at Every Size
Stigma
Feminism and the body
Social construction of disability
Objectification and commodification of the deviant body
Fiction and the deviant body
Language and the body
Deviant bodies across cultures and time

Please email a brief abstract and c.v./resume to:

Tara James
Women’s History Graduate Program
Sarah Lawrence College
Bronxville, NY 10708
Email: tjames@sarahlawrence.edu
Phone: 914-395-2405

Deadline December, 3 2010

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The No Make-Up Week Experiment

 

http://rabbitwrite.com/no-make-up-week/ where you can see my nakedface photos

“Yeah, but I don’t wear much….”  were my first thoughts, when I thought of running this experiment. No Make-up Week:  the idea was good, I thought, but my heart raced a little as it sank in. “But I don’t wear much.”  And I realized I was a little quick to run to the defense of my palettes and powder.

It’s not about taking a week off  because make-up is somehow bad or because not wearing it is better. It’s that by taking a week off, I should be able to understand my relationship to cosmetics more clearly. Why do I feel I need to sketch on eyebrow pencil before going to the grocery? To shellac my face before seeing a friend? And if I am going to a networking event or party, can I feel comfortable in anything less than  contoured cheeks and caked on lashes?

When I think about not wearing make-up for a week, a voice inside of me screams, Noooooooooo! And this is exactly what I want to explore. I mean, the thing is this: Make-up is a powerful tool, it has the ability to transform, to incite imagination and creativity. But, when an option turns into a necessity,  I don’t know it it’s still a tool. At the least, it loses it’s spark.

And then, there are the social reasons that push us to wear make-up. A study online claims that 8 out of 10 women prefer their female colleagues to wear makeup and the same number of women said they would rather employ a woman who wore makeup than one who didn’t. Because of these expectations, I think it’s hard for any woman to have a good relationship to make-up.

For me, a good relationship with make-up isn’t a given, but it is something to work towards. Because of these strong social ideas about make-up, it seems most women could not naturally have a healthy relationship with our cosmetics. Whether you wear make-up or not, there is a story there. I often feel like I *need* make-up. And when there is not a real feeling of choice, this needs to be explored.

THE EXPERIMENT AND WHERE YOU COME IN

The experiment is to go entire week without make-up. To do the naked face to work, meetings, dates, networking events and all in between without a balanced complexion or darkened lashes. The idea is to explore why I wear make-up and my relationship to it.

I’m asking you to conduct your own experiment. To go a day or a week without make-up, to upload a no make-up photo online or simply explore the relationship through writing or whatever feels right. Make it your own.

I’ve asked some bloggers to make the experiment their own, but I want to shout from the rooftops that everyone is invited to join in, the more of us out there doing this, the better.

It should also be said this isn’t just for people who wear make-up daily, or who don’t wear at all. This is for everyone. I think everyone can find some personal depth in the question: how does make-up impact you? What personal care products do you use, why?

When we start unraveling the threads, we see a lot of issues are embedded. There is the input of our families and friends–we all have a history with make-up, some not as pretty as others. There is the feminist question of why and for who? Who are we trying to impress? And in many offices, it’s scary to consider, what the reaction would be if one showed up sans-make-up. There is also the issue of toxins in our make-up. Carcinogens that are laced into many mainstream products.

These issues and more are the things I’ll be tackling during No Make-up Week.

I am inviting you to explore your relationship to cosmetics. To explore why you wear it, what it does for you and maybe, to rediscover some spark about yourself, your looks and your cosmetics.

The Official Home for No Make Up Week is http://rabbitwrite.com/no-make-up-week/This is where I will be updating all  No Make up Week happenings and is a good resource to point people to, so check back often!

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Call for Papers: Asexuality Studies

Asexuals are commonly defined as “a person who does not experience sexual attraction” and research estimates their prevalence at 1% of the population. Asexuality has been the subject of increasing media attention, with some high profile television and popular press coverage. This attention has stimulated academic interest in asexuality and considerable research is being conducted in a number of disciplines.

This volume will be an edited book focusing on all aspects of asexuality and the asexual community. It will collect cutting-edge research across all areas relating to this topic with the intention of constituting the foundational text for the burgeoning field of asexuality studies.

Papers are welcome from any discipline and on any topic relating to asexuality.

Possible topics include:

- Identifying as asexual
- Experiences of living as asexual
- Social history of the asexual community
- Diversity within the asexual community
- Asexuality and the Internet
- Asexuality and romantic relationships
- Asexuality and wider sexual culture
- Medicalization of a/sexuality

If you have any questions or would like to discuss a submission, please contact m.a.carrigan@warwick.ac.uk

Submissions Due May 2011

Up to 8000 words

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FSC Issues a Call-to-Action for the Adult Online Community

ICANN has posted the Revised Proposed Registry Agreement and Due Diligence Documentation for public comment on the ICANN website.  FSC has responded to the Board with a letter of requests and has filed a Documentary Information Disclosure Policy for additional information.

We need your help!  FSC is launching an industry-wide call-to-action.  It is imperative that you speak up now! 

ICANN’s .XXX current comment period closes Thursday, September 23rd so ACT NOW!

There are two ways in which adult industry professionals can be counted on the public forum:

1. Click on the link below and respond to the statements of opposition.  FSC will compile the data and report it to ICANN

http://www.zoomerang.com/Survey/WEB22B6YZULW6R

2. Or better yet, PLEASE write your own statement of opposition to ICM’s proposed .XXX sTLD.  Below are some issues you may want to stress. 

Comments can be posted on:

xxx-revised-icm-agreement@icann.org

Public Comment Suggestions

Make sure that you mention that you are a professional member of the adult online community-the party most impacted by the ICANN Board’s decision.  Write to the Board about any of a number of issues as demonstrated below. 

Let the Board know that you are concerned…

… that ICM is pushing unnecessarily for a “responsible” global online community when the adult entertainment community already has an entity through which Internet publishers and others can self identify as a responsible global online adult entertain¬ment community through the Free Speech Coalition and its Code of Ethics.

… with companies that have pre-registered .XXX domain names but are in opposition to a .XXX sTLD .  By ICM’s own definition those companies do not qualify for a .XXX sTLD because they do not voluntarily agree to the .XXX sTLD and thus believe that ICM’s proposed .XXX sTLD would be detrimental to their business.

… with the lack of transparency surrounding ICM’s submissions in the omission of the names of IFFOR Board members and Policy Council members who will develop regulations for the .XXX online industry. 

… that adult businesses would be required to agree to comply with “IFFOR Policies and Best Practices Guidelines” that have yet to be created by boards and councils which have yet to be revealed.

… that information provided for public comment is insufficient.  Members of the adult entertainment community require more information about the application in order to provide the appropriate level of feedback to the ICANN Board for it to make an informed decision. 

… that if additional information is provided, the community most impacted by .XXX, the adult online community will not have sufficient time to respond and therefore request that the public comment period be extended 30 days after additional information that has been requested has been supplied.

Thank you.  Your time and effort are greatly appreciated.  If you have any questions or require additional information contact diane@freepeechcoalition.com.

Comments can be posted on: xxx-revised-icm-agreement@icann.org

Remember…. ICANN N’s .XXX current comment period closes Thursday, September 23rd so act now!

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Transgender & Personal Identity: Call for Participants

Transgender & Personal Identity

A research project sponsored by the
Canada Social Sciences And Humanities Research Council

Prof. M. A. Gilbert, PhD.
Principal Investigator
Department of philosophy
York University
Toronto, Canada

This is the site for the research project Transgender & Personal Identity.

This investigation is concerned with the relationship between the movement from one gender and/or sex to another. What sort of experiences does an individual who begins life birth-designated as a female, but becomes a male have? If a natal male (someone born a boy) becomes a cross-dresser, what psychological, if any, changes occur when he “crosses over”? What can trans folks, those people born into one sex but who sometimes or all the time live in the other, tell us about life on the other side?

These are just a few of the questions this project will address. The project will seek out trans people who have changed gender at some point in their lives after reaching maturity. If you think you are one of those people and are interested in being interviewed, please click on our Interview Me! page. (It has not been activated yet.) If you think you are not the right person for an interview or it is not convenient, you can still fill out our Tell a Story page. There you can share one or more experiences you have had in your current gender.

The web site has number of distinct parts. Here is a brief guide to them

    * Brief Overview describes, in lay terms, the goals and outline of the project. If you are interested in our work, might be a good candidate for an interview, or are just curious, this page will help you.
    * Full Overview is, as the name implies, a thorough presentation of the project, complete with background, motivation, goals, and bibliography.
    * Interview Me! This page is the preamble to the questionnaire, and will help you decide if you can, ought, or want to be interviewed.
    * Questionnaire is the instrument created for this project. It is through the questionnaire that we ultimately decide who will be most useful for our purposes.
    * Tell a Story allows all trans persons and those connected to them to tell a tale about a cross-gender experience they have had. These are anecdotes that show how one can experience life from the other side, thereby gaining insight and understanding. All stories, serious and funny, are invited.
    * Links contains just a few web sites that are relevant to the project.

We need to find interview candidates for this project. The results will shed light on what it means to be trans, and how some people have experienced it. So, if you’re transsexual or a crossdresser, fill out our questionnaire and send it along. If we find you’re right for us and we can connect, then you get to talk about yourself for as long as you like! (OK. more like an hour.)

The questionnaire is short, and you might be right for TPI. If you click here you’ll open or download it. Then just fill it out and email it to us as an attachment at, tpi@yorku.ca.

If that doesn’t work, copy it into an email and send that along. if that doesn’t work, print it out and send it to,

TPI Project c/o Miqqi Alicia Gilbert
South 428 Ross
York University
4700 Keele St.
Toronto, ON M4K 1C9
CANADA

We want it anyway you can give it.

Problems? Questions? Send them to us at tpi@yorku.ca.

(h/t Jack Molay)

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