education

arvan's picture

Sex+++ Documentary Film Series is looking for grant application advice

I was speaking with Lisa Junkin at the Sex+++ Documentary Film Series last week.  She said that the success of the series has endeared it to the community, shown value for the Museum and University.  It has also grown beyond the budget they have set aside for it.  Lisa is now looking to convert it into something viable and something that can reach even more people.  Her background is not in grant application or funding in general and I suggested that she write up a description of what she is looking for so that we can post it for you all to see.  So, here is a brief note from Lisa about what the film series needs and the kind of help they could use.  -a

Hi, my name is Lisa and I co-organize the Sex Positive Documentary Film Series, an educational film and discussion series about diverse aspects of sexuality, particularly at the margins. I have a question about funding sources for this program and am hoping that the community here could weigh in.

This series is run by my employer, the Jane Addams Hull-House Museum, which is a part of the University of Illinois Chicago. We have hosted this series for more than 2 years and it has been highly successful, but we have never acquired a grant for it. So far, the program has been entirely funded by the museum's resources and by generous donations by individuals and private businesses. But we're lining up our next two years of AMAZING films, and the costs are adding up.

We would like to find a grant or other funding source to help pay for our expenses, but so far it has been difficult to find a good match.  Our content is, as you can imagine, a bit unconventional for some feminist or woman-oriented funding sources, and we can't accept major funding from places like Playboy because of concerns at the university level (though note that we count among our private donors a dungeon and a sex toy shop.) Other foundations relating to sexuality tend to be either policy-driven or are oriented to address issues of rape and violence, which doesn't match our focus closely enough.

Thoughts? Any suggestions would be much appreciated.

Our program goals are as follows:

+Screen and discuss documentary films with a positive, informative spin on human sexuality
+Establish a conversation about positive sexuality among communities that aren't currently cross-pollinating
+Support filmmakers creating new work on sexual identities and topics
+Create a replicable model for excellent sex positive programming and community building

For more on the series:
http://www.uic.edu/jaddams/hull/_programsevents/_upcomingevents/_events/sex+++/sex+++.html

Film list from our first year:
http://clarissethorn.com/blog/2009/01/15/the-sex-positive-documentary-film-list-finally-here/

Lisa Junkin
Education Coordinator
Jane Addams Hull-House Museum
University of Illinois at Chicago
800 S. Halsted Street, M/C 051
Chicago, IL 60607
(312)355-5301
www.hullhousemuseum.org

Buck Angel's picture

Buck Angel's Women's HIV/AIDS Prevention PSA

Hi.  This is my Public Service Announcement on the importance of safe sex and the prevention of HIV/AIDS.  Playboy playmate,fitness expert and HIV/AIDS educator Rebekka Armstrong speaks about how she got infected with AIDS and how you can prevent this from happening to you! 

See more about Rebekka Armstrong at www.rebekkaonline.net.

Here is a list of great HIV/AIDS resources:
http://www.thebody.com/index.html
http://www.poz.com/
http://www.projinf.org/
http://hivinsite.ucsf.edu/

- Buck

arvan's picture

Transformative Justice Law Project: Name Change Mobilization

Dear Allies and Supporters of the Transformative Justice Law Project of Illinois (TJLP),

We are very excited to announce the start of our Name Change Mobilization project!  During this monthly event, attorneys and trained volunteers will help transgender and gender non-conforming folks file petitions to change their names legally at the Daley Center in downtown Chicago.  Volunteers will then provide follow-up support services to accompany folks to their court dates and help them navigate the subsequent name change processes at the Department of Motor Vehicles, Social Security Office, Department of Vital Records, etc.  This event will happen once a month on the last Friday of every month from 9am - 4pm.  Our goal is simple: we want to help as many people as possible legally change their names as part of our long-term goal of gender self-determination for all, free of government limitation.

Here are the details for our first mobilization!!!!

When: January 28th (this Friday)
Time: 9am - 4pm
Where: The Daley Center, 50 W. Washington, 12th floor

Do not fear! If you cannot attend this month's Mobilization, this is an ongoing project of TJLP and will reoccur on the last Friday of every month with the next two mobilizations already on February 25th and March 25th.  We send many thanks those with the financial means to donate to TJLP and help make this event possible.

If you have any questions regarding the Name Change Mobilization or know of anyone that would like to participate by either getting their name legally changed or by volunteering to help folks change their names legally, please let us know!  Our contact information for the event is namechange@tjlp.org, 773-272-1822 (phone/text).  Please see attached posters for our first mobilization in both Spanish and English.

GET EXCITED!!!!  We sure are!!!

And as always:  Fight to win!

In Solidarity,
Your friends at TJLP (website) (facebook)

LaPrincipessa's picture

Support the Birth Control Matters Campaign For Contraception With No Co-Pays

Birth Control Matters is an effort to make birth control available with no copays so that all women can use the method that works best for them and to reduce the number of unintended pregnancies.

Affordable prescription birth control is an essential part of health care for millions of women. The average woman spends 30 years of her life trying to avoid getting pregnant. More than one-third of women voters in America have struggled with the cost of prescription birth control at some point in their lives, and, as a result, have used birth control inconsistently.

No copays for birth control is the single most important step we can take to reduce the number of unintended pregnancies.

The new health care reform law represents the single biggest opportunity to advance women’s health in 45 years. 

To make this opportunity a reality, the law must require health plans to provide prescription birth control to women with no copays, as part of the prevention provision. 

This would be a huge step forward for America – and especially for the many of women in this nation who cannot afford to pay for prescription contraception.

Please read the entire release from Planned Parenthood and find ways to donate and spread the word.

(Posted at Women Undefined)

Clarisse Thorn's picture

Call for Sexy Documentaries: Sex+++ Has Five New Themes

I hate to post two press releases in a row, but I’ve been very caught up in some Chicago community issues lately, so I haven’t had time to write anything more personal. I’ll bore you all with details about my life soon, I promise! In the meantime, please feel free to repost this …

SEX+++

pro-sex, pro-queer, pro-kink

Contact:

Clarisse Thorn :: clarisse.thorn at gmail dot com

+ Q. “What is being sex-positive?”

+ A. “Defining sex on my terms.”

+ A. “Understanding my sexual needs.”

+ A. “Being in charge of my sexual experiences.”

The Sex+++ Documentary Film Series is now entering its third year. We want to make it bigger and better than ever — and take it in new directions! We’re still discussing next year’s film line-up, and we’ve got a lot of ideas, but we also want to throw open the floor. We’re looking for suggestions and submissions: documentaries that are pro-sex, pro-queer, and pro-kink.

In 2011, Sex+++ will focus on several themes. We’re still discussing these themes, and they are subject to change as we research documentaries and develop the program, but here’s what we’ve thought of so far. We’re open to hearing more about any and all sex-positive documentaries — but in particular, if you’ve encountered documentaries that fit within these themes, please let us know!

+ THEME: Sex Everywhere

We want to explore how sexuality, sexual culture, sexual identity, and sexual pleasure are recorded, experienced, and understood outside the USA.

+ THEME: Love And Sex

We want to explore the many ways sex happens within romance, dating, relationships, marriage, and love.

+ THEME: Sexual History

We want to explore the history of sexuality, sexual culture, sexual identity, and sexual pleasure; we want to learn about sex-positive heroes.

+ THEME: Talking Sex

We want to explore how people talk about sex, sexual pleasure, and consent.

+ THEME: Activist Sex

We want to explore sex-related activism and how sex-positivity intersects with other social issues such as class, race, labor, health, justice and the environment.

Sex+++ will continue at its current amazing venue, Chicago’s own Jane Addams Hull-House Museum. Click here to learn what’s up with Sex+++ right now. And again — if you’ve got any documentaries to recommend, please get in touch! The primary contact for Sex+++ is Clarisse Thorn, who can be reached at clarisse.thorn at gmail dot com.

Clarisse Thorn's picture

[advice] A 16-yr-old kinkster who wants “a sense of personal integrity”

When I received the following email, I was sitting in my mother’s living room. I read the letter aloud to Mom where she was standing in the kitchen; she stopped what she was doing, came over and sat down across from me. When I was done, she said, “That’s heartbreaking. This girl sounds just like you.”

Yeah, I relate a lot to this one.

Dear Clarisse,

I’m sorry to email you out of the blue like this, but I’ve been reading your blog for a few months now and it’s been a great help to me. I’m also sorry if this is pretty personal, but I don’t know of anyone else with any relevant experience that I can turn to. You’ve always seemed friendly and open to discussion from what I’ve read, so I hope you won’t mind.

OK. Here goes. Basically, I’ve had what I now know to be BDSM leanings since an early age — tying up the Barbie dolls, bizarre childhood games, the works, gaining a more sexual edge in my teenage years. I never really thought about it, and if I did, I would just think, “Oh well, I can think and fantasise about what I like, it doesn’t hurt anyone, why should I be ashamed?” The difficulty for me has come in my first proper relationship. I’ve been with my boyfriend for 10 months and it’s not a secret between us. I mean, it surprised him, but he’s completely fine with it and he seems pretty enthusiastic (and has consistently over the past nine months or so, so I think it might be more than just to please me, though he’s not as into it as I am). Maybe I should specify. I don’t enjoy labelling myself, but I suppose you would call me a submissive. 

As I’m sure you can relate to, this poses some problems for me. I’ve always thought of myself as a strong, independent young woman. I endured bullying at school and I have always espoused — or tried to, to the best of my ability — a philosophy that can be neatly summed up as “Fuck ‘em.” It’s very difficult for me to come to terms with this other side of myself, that, while it was always there, never really intruded on my actual life, if you see what I mean. Now it does. I’m saying these things I’ve thought about a lot of my life, and doing some of them too. There’s a level — well, two, the rational level and the physical one — where I’m completely OK with it, but another part of me — I suppose the emotional part — is entirely disgusted. If it was just the pain, I could deal with that. It’s this desire for submission that makes me feel sick about myself. The thing is, rationally, I know that there’s no reason why I can’t be a strong woman in my relationships and my everyday life but play with a power dynamic during sex acts. I mean, from what I’ve read, you do it fine! I just don’t know how to make that leap. I’m sure you know the feeling I’m talking about.

I should also add that I’m 16 and a virgin, and the same with my boyfriend. This entire kaboodle is new to me and I don’t really know what I’m doing, and this is really causing me quite a lot of anguish. I don’t really know where to go for support. I can hardly ask at the regular sexual health clinic! I wouldn’t know where to start looking for kink-aware therapists, as you did. Besides that, I would have to talk to my parents about it. I’ve spoken to my mother about BDSM briefly in conversation without letting her know anything about myself, and she said she thought relationships like that were “unhealthy” and “destructive”. I’m sure that’s just ignorance on her part, but I don’t feel like I’m ready to come out to her, and explain why it’s OK, at least not until I’m sure about this myself. It still feels partly unreal, as though it’s something I’ve created in myself that will go away if I ignore it — even though I know that’s not the case. I share the feeling that you’ve written about before — I’ve never been in an “other-ed” minority before, being white and middle-class etc. My boyfriend is very supportive and caring, but to be honest, he doesn’t know what he’s doing any better than I do! So I hope that you will be able to offer me some reassurance and advice. Your blog, as I’ve said, has been a great help, but reading something like that, wonderful as it is, isn’t the same and doesn’t have the same power to reassure as a more personal dialogue. I hope you see what I mean and don’t just think that I’m seeking attention. That is not my goal here. All I’m after is a sense of personal integrity. Perhaps in the end that can only come from myself, but, it would be nice to be told I’m not completely mad!

arvan's picture

What Will We Teach Our Sons About Rape?

Andrea Gibson performs, "Blue Blanket" from her album, Swarm 

arvan's picture

Sex Education Is A Political Act.

(This post is part of a blog carnival to raise awareness and funding for Scarleteen - the longest running fact-based sex education resource on the Intenet.)


(via withoutgods)

Sex Education is a political act. 

In terms of group politics - there are large groups of people who are fighting to prevent you from learning any facts about sex.  Facts that can effect your health, income, present, future, career, happiness, ability to have or enjoy sex, choice of sex partners and even the ability to have sex.

People get elected using by using sex to scare voters - queer sex, teen sex, unmarried sex, kinky sex, fun sex, sex of any kind.    Cultural practices and commonly held beliefs about sex punish or shame people for even discussing sex, much less teaching it to a classroom.

Organized religions and self-appointed 'holy men' claim to speak for their god in calling sex a sin.  Sex is a fact of mammalian evolution and humans are mammals.  That undisputable, proven fact is a direct challenge to the notion of sin and therefore a challenge to any religious or secular institution that believes that sex is a sin.

In the arena of personal politics - young people are dependent upon those who come before us to offer up the knowledge of previous generations - or they can withhold it.  As teens we struggle with asking the adults in our lives for information, guidance and the benefit of their experience on one hand, while on the other hand - we wish to assert our own judgment and choices. 

What you are told about sex is a political act. 

People who may or may not have your interests in mind spend a lot of time shaping the information you receive about sex because they want you to make decisions that favor them or their world view.  What is best for them may not be what is best for you.  The only way for you to make an informed decision is for you to have facts.

arvan's picture

Middle Sexes: Redefining He and She

(h/t Decidedly Obscure Human Complaints)

This documentary by filmmaker Antony Thomas (HBO's Celibacy), Middle Sexes: Redefining He and She sensitively explores the controversial subject of the blurring of gender as well as the serious social and family problems - even dangers - often faced by those whose gender may fall somewhere in between male and female.

Narrated by noted author Gore Vidal and filmed in the United States, Europe, Asia, and South America, Middle Sexes examines the ways different societies and cultures handle the blurring of gender, sexual identity and sexual orientation.

Through interviews with transgender, intersexual and bisexual men and women, as well as experts from the scientific and academic communities, the film considers the entire spectrum of sexual behavior, personal identity and lifestyles among people of different backgrounds and cultures.  From this, a theme of tolerance and appreciation of diversity emerges in the film.

Middle Sexes: Redefining He and She

(Part 1)

arvan's picture

Talking About the Taboo: 2nd CSPH Annual Conference

CSPH 2nd Annual Conference

October 10th

1:00-5:00 Pm

Yes, folks, it’s that time of year again, The Center for Sexual Pleasure and Health welcomes you to our 2nd annual conference, “Talking About the Taboo, Discussing Difficult Issues in Human Sexuality.”

For the first time ever, The CSPH will provide sexuality education to adults in a safe and open environment. By bringing together all aspects of sexuality, the pleasure, education, advocacy and medical worlds, we hope to take subjects that are traditionally “taboo” and elucidate them, showing that the taboo can be fun, interesting and educational and most importantly, able to be discussed in thoughtful, provoking ways.

Talk to an Expert:

“Talking About the Taboo” will feature many sexuality experts willing to share with you their work in the field of sexuality. From medical providers, rape crisis counselors, to dominatrixes, you are sure to find someone to teach you something new! Listen to our panel, take a small group class or chat it up with our experts throughout the event.

Play with a Toy:

Check out our vendors, who will be showing off the latest and greatest in sexual aids. These top of the line, 100% safe toys and products can help to enhance your sex life in many ways.

Hear our Panel:

This year’s conference brings us some of the most noteworthy participants in the realm of sexuality. Be sure to stick around for what is sure to be an informative and lively panel addressing current issues surrounding sexuality. Our guest panelists will include:

Dr. Charlie Glickman,

Princess Kali,

Audacia Ray,

Sinclair Sexsmith,

Dr. Logan Levkoff

Anita Hoffner

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