education

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CALL FOR PAPERS - Gender & Development: Migration

The March 2011 issue of the international journal Gender & Development, (published for Oxfam GB by Routledge/Taylor and Francis) will focus on Migration.

The decision to leave home is not taken lightly. It is both frequent and normal for millions of women and men, worldwide, to travel away from their homes and families to seek peace, security, or the means to make a living.

Increasingly, development researchers and workers are asking for guidance on how to plan and implement work to support migrants, their families and dependents - at home, and in their new locations. This necessitates a shift in the traditional development focus on the needs of a community in a particular place, to supporting the human networks which shift between rural to urban locations, between countries, and back again.

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UN CEDAW urges Ukraine to eliminate discrimination against Romani women

[via Neww-Polska]

The European Roma Rights Centre (ERRC) and International Charitable Organization Roma Women Fund “Chiricli” welcome the Concluding Comments of the UN Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) in its review of Ukraine’s compliance with the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women.  The ERRC and Chiricli submitted a report to the Committee in the run-up to its review bringing attention to the situation of Romani women in Ukraine.

In its Concluding Comments, the Committee noted with regret the “lack of information in relation to […] vulnerable groups of women, in particular Romani women, who may be subjected to multiple forms of discrimination.” It invited the Ukrainian government to “provide comprehensive information and statistical data, in its next periodic report, on the situation of migrant and refugee women and of other vulnerable groups of women, in particular Roma women, who may be subjected to multiple forms of discrimination […] and on the measures taken for eliminating discrimination against these women with regard to their access to health, education, employment, social benefits, etc.”

In its review session the Committee strongly emphasised the need to make use of temporary special measures to improve the situation of Romani women. The Committee recommends that the Ukrainian government “adopt and implement temporary special measures, including quotas, as part of a comprehensive strategy aimed at the achievement of substantive gender equality in areas where women are underrepresented or disadvantaged, as well as for women suffering from multiple forms of discrimination, such as Roma women.”

The Committee also urged the Ukrainian government to “intensify its efforts to overcome persistent stereotypes that are discriminatory against women” with particular reference to Romani women, and to remove obstacles encountered by women to access shelters and social centres for victims of domestic violence, and to “immediate means of redress and protection, without limitation of age or of another kind.”

The full text of the CEDAW Committee’s Concluding Comments on Ukraine is available here: http://www2.ohchr.org/english/bodies/cedaw/docs/co/CEDAW-C-UKR-CO-7.pdf  

In their report, based on first hand research throughout the country conducted in cooperation with local Romani women, the ERRC and Chiricli highlighted that there is no comprehensive anti-discrimination law in Ukraine via which Romani women can seek to defend their rights and challenge abuses when these occur. This is especially worrying in light of the fact that Romani women in Ukraine are at times subject to multiple and/or intersectional discrimination. The report revealed that 43% of the Romani women interviewed are victims of domestic violence and a very low percentage (only 2.5%) of Romani women interviewed access higher education due to patriarchal traditions, poverty, ethnic segregation or harassment by non-Roma classmates. As a result of this lack of education and direct or indirect discrimination on the job market, many Romani women lack access to formal employment and are forced to accept work in the grey economy, excluding them from state social benefits. Extreme poverty, inadequate housing and the disadvantaged position of Romani women make their health situation significantly worse then that of other female populations in Ukraine, or that of Romani men.

For further information, please contact:

Ostalinda Maya, ERRC, ostalinda.maya@errc.org +36 1 413 2200 (English and Spanish)

Zola Kondur, Chiricli, kondurzola@yahoo.com +380675096248 (English, Ukranian and Rus

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Global Maternal Health Conference 2010: Call for Submissions

Global Maternal Health Conference 2010

India Habitat Centre

New Delhi, India

August 30, 31, September 1

Updates: Global Maternal Health Conference 2010

Global Maternal Health Conference Website Launched

Check out our new Conference website www.gmhconference2010.com!  All the news and information currently available about the Global Maternal Health Conference 2010 is now online.  This is where you’ll learn about registration, abstract submission, the conference program, and all the logistics you’ll need to attend the first ever global conference devoted exclusively to maternal health. Be sure to bookmark this site and visit it often – it will be continually updated as the conference nears.

Abstract Submission Now Open

Submit your abstract for a poster or a presentation at The Global Maternal Health Conference 2010 now!  The deadline is April 30th and all the details are available here.

A 20-person Conference steering committee has been hard at work identifying the themes and sub-themes that will by the focus of the 3-day conference.

The themes are:

Maternal Health Interventions and Programs
Underlying Factors Affecting Maternal Health
Measurement--Trends and Methods
Reproductive Health
Health Systems
Policy and Advocacy

More information about the themes and subthemes is available here.

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Call for applications to the CSBR Sexuality Institute

Coalition for Sexual and Bodily Rights in Muslim Societies (CSBR)

III. CSBR Sexuality Institute 2010

18-25 September 2010, Jakarta, Indonesia

***Deadline for Applications: May 21, 2010***

The Coalition for Sexual and Bodily Rights in Muslim Societies (CSBR) is pleased to announce the 3rd CSBR Sexuality Institute 2010 to be held between September 18th and 25th 2010 in Jakarta, Indonesia.  Designed as a comprehensive curriculum on sexuality, sexual and reproductive health and rights with an in depth discussion on the linkages between research and practice, the CSBR Sexuality Institute offers a holistic interdisciplinary program combining history, theory, research and politics of sexuality with applications of advocacy, and fieldwork.
 
The CSBR Sexuality Institute brings together leading leading sexual and reproductive rights activists, academics and researchers. Held previously in Malaysia (2008) and Turkey (2009) with participants from 19 countries throughout Asia, Africa and the Middle East, the institutes include lectures, group work, roundtables, panels, site visits and film screenings, as well as a methodology to engage participants’ own experiences around sexuality.

Background

“I would summarize the experience I had at the CSBR Institute in one word - that is: LIBERATING. The novelty of this [CSBR’s] discourse in our socio-cultural context is certainly one important aspect, but more importantly, the silence that our society harbors around sexuality has become so “normal” that we often forget how integral it is to our existence and well-being.”  (Mahrukh Mouhiddin, BRAC University – Bangladesh, CSBR Sexuality Institute 2008).
 
“In one sentence; the Institute has shown me that sexuality is not only about problems, ill-being and repercussion; it is also about pleasure, happiness, well being and CHANGE” (Gulalai Ismail, Aware Girls – Pakistan, CSBR Sexuality Institute 2009).

The realization of sexual and reproductive health and rights is an integral part of gender equality, development and social justice. However, sexuality continues to be a contested site of political struggles both in Muslim societies and across the globe. Increasing global militarism, conservatism, and nationalism over the last decades provoked a serious backlash on sexual and reproductive health and rights, both at national and global levels. Given the current polarizations, it is more pertinent than ever to strengthen critical insight, further research, enhance knowledge and capacity on sexual and reproductive health and rights, and build an inclusive and affirmative discourse on sexuality.
 
Aim

In the above mentioned context, the aims of the CSBR Sexuality Institute are:

To further knowledge on the multi-dimensional and intersecting aspects of sexuality, health and rights;

To develop a deeper theoretical understanding of sexuality through a historical overview and analysis of current debates and research at the global level;

To  provide a comprehensive and holistic understanding of sexuality in Muslim societies through a discussion of the history, legal frameworks, research, and current discourses;

To enhance participants’ sexual and reproductive health and rights advocacy skills on national and international levels;

To increase participants’ capacity as leading advocates, practitioners and researchers on sexuality issues at national, regional and international levels.

“In face of the rise of the so called fundamentalism or hard line Islamic revivalism, the Institute gave me the basic paradigm to see and analyze how we take position in order to challange the repression.” (Dwi Ayu, Komnas Perempuan – Indonesia, CSBR Sexuality Institute 2008).

“I have never been to anything this exhaustive and detailed. It shed light on the intersections between religion, sexuality, health, the terminology and bodily rights. I learned more about the international arena and how to use it to advance your case. It was very instrumental for me both at the personal and professional level, basically shaping the way I will address my work.”  (Joelle Hatem, MEEM – Lebanon, CSBR Sexuality Institute 2009).

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Interview: Nancy Schwartzman, Director of "The Line"

Have you ever been coerced into sex with someone?  Have you ever coerced someone for sex? 

If so, you may have had your line crossed or crossed someone else's.

For those unaware of the film, "The Line" is about a woman (in this case, the filmmaker herself) who is raped and her efforts to confront her attacker.  The film also examines our cultural prejudices against rapists and those who are raped.

The expectations and judgments we place on others and ultimately ourselves are examined and questioned as Nancy views the impact of cultural projections arising from gender, power, language and identity. 

Running through all this is the ideas of consent and communication.  Where, when, what & how a person speaks to indicate their line of consent / no consent and this place is "The Line" that the film addresses. 

We all know what we are comfortable with and have some idea of what we'll experiment with and we probably know the things we're not comfortable with.  These things can alter over time, but the issue in this film is when a person feels like saying "No", do they have the language and the ability to say so?.  Social stereotypes may inform a person that they don't have the right to say no.  Or, they may feel that they "owe " compliance to someone because they said "yes" before or some other reason.  Many of us will have different answers to the same situation at different points in our lives.  But, for many people their line gets crossed and they are left with no idea of what happened or how to deal with it.

This film is a great tool for individuals of any sex, gender, age or class to view as a means to understanding their participation in the rape elements of our shared cultures.  I recommend it highly. 

The target audience is people wishing to understand boundaries and consent.  It is also being appled as a tool for educators, sex educators, activists and organizations or people working with gender based violence.

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Inés Alberdi: A Life Free of Violence for Women and Girls

 

By Inés Alberdi, UNIFEM Executive Director

Date: 27 March 2010

Occasion: Fifth Meeting of Women for a Better World, Valencia, Spain, 27–28 March 2010.

Good morning. It is a pleasure to join my distinguished colleagues in this dialogue on women’s health and rights. My remarks will take up the issue of violence against women and girls and UNIFEM strategy to end this pandemic.

National surveys show that as many as 17 to 76 percent of women experience physical and/or sexual violence at some point in their lifetime, most often by husbands and intimate partners. It takes place in the home, on the streets, in schools, the workplace, in fields, refugee camps, during conflicts and crises. As such, it strips countries of the human capital and productivity needed in the struggle to end poverty, improve education and health and propel development. Violence against women has also been a silent but potent culprit in the feminization and spread of HIV It is now recognized as a public health issue in many countries, one that undermines the health of individuals and the strength of communities and societies.

Despite its harmful effects, violence against women has long been regarded as essentially a private issue. Today, after decades of struggle by women’s rights activists, ending violence against women is positioned high on policy-making agendas. A record number of countries have adopted laws, policies and action plans to end violence against women, and a growing number are ensuring budgets for their implementation. Landmark agreements since the 1993 UN Declaration on Violence against Women and the 1995 Beijing Platform for Action include the world summits in 2000 and 2005, recognizing the importance of ending violence against women to achieve the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).

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New Presentation: “Disordered or Just Different? Myth, Science, and Sexuality”

The theme of this conference is: “Dangerous Nonsense - Exploring the Gulf between Science and its Impostors.”

This theme is the context for her talk entitled “Disordered or Just Different? Myth, Science, and Sexuality” that will focus on the scientific evidence on core sexuality obtained over the last fifty years and the medical profession’s treatment of intersex, homosexual, and transsexual peoples.

Here’s a conference description and schedule:

The Center For Inquiry/Chicago First Annual Spring Conference:
Dangerous Nonsense: Exploring the Gulf between Science and its Impostors

Saturday, April 24th, 2010

 

8:30 a.m. to 5:15 p.m.

111 E. Wacker Drive, Chicago 60601
26th Floor - Conference Room
 
Bunkum grows like a weed in American culture - whether it's climate change denial, conspiracy theories, or healing by prayer.  Some ideas are not only nonsense, they are dangerous nonsense, with serious implications for our lives.  In this age where misinformation can be spread more easily than ever before, understanding the role of the scientific process in human affairs is critical to our survival.  This conference will present top scientists in biology, physiology, and physics, each of them gifted at explaining both the science and its impostors of their respective fields. 
 
Join them and gain valuable insight into exploring the world through science and reason.
Clarisse Thorn's picture

Chicago feminist sex ed paper focuses on LGBTQ students’ needs

I recently received this interesting and, of course, incredibly flattering letter, and offered to give the project more publicity by publishing the letter to my blog. (Which isn’t to say that I need flattery to give good projects publicity, but I am human, you know?) I’ve already connected Stephanie with some people who can help her, but if you know anyone else who can, or are in a position to assist with her project yourself — or are simply interested and want to be kept informed of its process! — then you should totally email her: [ sgoldfarb at luc dot edu ].

Dear Clarisse,

My name is Stephanie Goldfarb and I am a graduate student at Loyola University. I am currently working on a research project that is focused on assessing the Chicago Public School’s sex/health education system. Specifically, I am interested in learning whether or not this system meets the needs of LGBT students. I also aim to formulate a working definition of “feminist sex/health” education. Though this will ultimately be a 25-30 page paper, it may evolve into my Masters thesis. As a leader in the sex positive community in Chicago, I thought it might be good to ask your opinions on this matter. Also, I am currently on the search for primary documents (such as CPS sex education curriculum and/or lesson plans) and I wonder if you might be able to point me in a good direction. Some of the articles on your wordpress site, especially “Liberal, sex-positive sex education: what’s missing” might be approved as primary sources for me, so I might end up citing you. Anyway, thank you for all the incredible work you do Clarisse. You are truly inspiring, and the sex positive community is beyond lucky to have you organizing, writing, and speaking out about the issues that are important to us.

- Stephanie Goldfarb
Loyola University Chicago
MSW / MA Women’s Studies Gender Studies Candidate
sgoldfarb at luc dot edu

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WIDE Annual Conference 2010

WIDE Annual Conference 2010 "Migration in the context of globalisation", will take place on June 4-5, 2010, in Bucharest, Romania.

WIDE AC 2010 is organized by our Romanian partner "AUR" ­ The National Association of Human Resources Specialists.

This year´s Conference marks also the 25th anniversary of WIDE. The UN Women´s world conference in Kenya 1985 marked the start for WIDE when feminists in Europe decided it was time to join hands and work together. In the past 25 years WIDE has become a strong network with 12 national and regional platforms in Europe, bringing together over 400 organisations and working with women from the South, form all continents. WIDE is the only European network focusing on trade, development and women´s rights, employing three kind of strategies to bring about change: through networking, capacity building and advocacy. This conference will build on WIDE´s long experience, activism and expertise.This Conference "Migration in the context of globalisation" will bring together and voice the experiences of migrant women from Europe, Latin America, Asia and Africa. And most importantly it will facilitate dialogue to come to common positions and actions for the coming years to take. Migration is an important process that is impacting people in Europe and worldwide.

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