ethics

arvan's picture

CfP: History of neurosciences and social and behavioural sciences conference

The first Joint Conference of Cheiron (The international Society for the History of the Behavioral and Social Sciences) and The International Society for the History of the Neurosciences (ISHN) will be held in Calgary / Banff (Canada). The main conference will be from June 16-19 at the University of Calgary, while a post-conference retreat (with workshops) will be held at the Banff Centre for the Arts from June 19-23, in the Rocky Mountains. Submissions for papers, posters, symposia/panels, or workshops are invited. When submitting poster/paper abstracts and letters of intent for symposia/panels and workshops, please indicate whether you would also consider attending the Banff retreat and presenting at that venue (especially posters and workshops).

Possible submissions may deal with any aspect of the history of the neurosciences, behavioral and social sciences or related historiographical and methodological issues.

The new, EXTENDED SUBMISSION DUE DATE IS NOW MARCH 11, 2011. All submissions must be received by *5pm CST that day*. Instructions for submitting proposals, as well as for registering at the conference, may be found at: Instructions for submitting proposals, as well as for registering at the conference, may be found at: http://www.ucalgary.ca/ISHN_Cheiron/symposium_submission.

Program Highlights and Keynote Speakers

Dr. David Hubel, John Franklin Enders Professor of Neurobiology, Emeritus, at the Harvard Medical School. Dr. Hubel shared the 1981 Nobel Prize for Physiology for his discoveries concerning information processing in the visual system.

Dr. David Wright, the Hannah Chair in the History of Medicine and Associate Dean of the Faculty of Humanities, McMaster University. Dr. Wright is the author and co-editor of seven books and more than two dozen peer reviewed articles and chapters on the history of mental health and psychiatry, including his latest work, Down’s Syndrome: A History.

Dr. Elizabeth Lunbeck, the Nelson Tyrone, Jr Professor of History and Chair, Department of History and Professor of Psychiatry at Vanderbilt University. States. She is the author of several books, including The Psychiatric Persuasion: Knowledge, Gender, and Power in Modern America (Princeton 1994, 1996), which won numerous awards including the John Hope Franklin Prize and the History of Women in Science Prize. At present she is editing Histories of Scientific Observation, with Lorraine Daston (Chicago, 2010), and completing two books on the history of psychoanalysis and its cultural meaning.

Dr. Andrew T. Scull, Distinguished Professor of Sociology and Science Studies at the University of California at San Diego, will give the joint Cheiron-ISHN conference keynote. His most recent work is Madmen: Durkheim and the Law (with Steven Lukes). The author or co-author of a number of books, some of his other recent works include: The Insanity of Place/The Place of Insanity: Essays in the History of Medicine, and Madhouse: A Tragic of Megalomania and Modern

Dr. Frank W. Stahnisch, who holds the AMF/Hannah Professorship in the History of Medicine and Health Care at the University of Calgary and is the current President of ISSHN, will present the 16th Annual ISHN Presidential Lecture. The author or co-author of four books, his book Ideas in Action: The Notion of Function and its Methodological Role in the Research Program of the Experimental Physiologist Francois Magendie (1783-1855), was one of the first specialized works in the German language on experimental practices in modern medical research laboratories.

Workshops to be Held in Banff:

"Mind and Body Medicine"
Monday, June-20 (2011)
(Morning and Early Afternoon)

"The 'Hard Problem' in History"
Monday, June-20 (2011)
(Later Afternoon)

"Eugenics and Psychiatry"
Tuesday, June-21 (2011)
(One Day Workshop)

"Student History of Neuroscience
Poster Workshop"
Wednesday, June-22 (2011)
(Half Day or One Day Workshop – depending on number of submissions)

arvan's picture

Extropy. Would you stop aging, if you could?

One scientist’s quest to solve the mystery of human aging.

From Ponce de Leon to Dorian Gray and beyond, the quest to halt aging has been one of the key sources of legend and imaginative literature.

“I first became interested in the subject,” says filmmaker Jonathan Sanden, “because it’s such a fundamental human yearning that has been explored throughout all art, literature, and religion: the fear of death and the desire to live forever.”

In Sanden’s film Extropy, a geneticist whose own father is succumbing to Alzheimer’s believes he had discovered a way to stop the aging process. He turns to an eccentric businessman to fund his endeavor, but with time running out for his father, begins testing his discovery on himself.

Annabelle River's picture

The Mary Kay Epilogue

 

I love Susie Bright. I first discovered her essays when I was in college, and I give her a lot of credit for my college epiphany that being a feminist and being a slut were not, after all mutually exclusive: That not only could I be an empowered woman and a masochist cock-craver, but that I could only become an empowered woman if I let go of the shame for my honest sexual desires. Thank you Susie Bright. I still follow her blog eagerly, although most of the time now it makes me feel like her proverbial preacher's choir.

Then, a couple weeks ago, Susie Bright covered the current whereabouts of Mary Kay Fualaau, better known to people who had access to television in the 1990's as Mary Kay Letourneau. For those who don't remember, Mary Kay Letourneau was imprisoned in 1997 for having sex with and becoming impregnated by her thirteen-year-old student, Vili Fualaau. She was released in January 1998, but by February she went back to jail for planning to run away with boy, and that October she gave birth to their second child. In 2001, Vili Fualaau's mother sued the school and police for failing to keep her son safe, but she lost: Police attorney Anne Bremner successfully convinced a jury, "Fualaau and Letourneau still 'see themselves as Romeo and Juliet' and want to get married... adding that there was nothing anyone could have done to keep the two apart." Letourneau finished her second jail sentence in 2004, at which point Fualaau, then 21, successfully petitioned the court to let him see her again. They married in 2005, in a ceremony covered by Entertainment Tonight. And now they have celebrated their fourth marriage anniversary, and host an event in a Seattle bar called "Hot for Teacher."

arvan's picture

If I ain't broke, don't fix me

I received a compelling link this morning from OdaRygh on the genital reassignment of children, for cosmetic and social reasoning.  When girls in Africa have their clitoris removed, we call it genital mutilation.  When a boy is born with a small penis and is subsquently subjected to surgery to remove testicles and create a sterile womb - it is done under the auspices of social pressure & male value as determined by penis length. 

Sterility is sterility.  Trauma is trauma.  No choice is no choice.  Please read the full article below.  You can see the entire article with links, here.

There is an detailed and relevant site, focused on a proposed bill to end this practice at mgmbill.org.

 

 

Ethical commentary on gender reassignment: a complex and provocative modern issue
Pediatric Nursing ,  Jan-Feb, 1998  

by Anna J. Catlin 

As ethics editor for Pediatric Nursing, I have examined many difficult ethical issues over the last year in this column. The normal procedure is to choose a manuscript that we have accepted for publication, extensively research the issue, speak to experts in the field, weigh the competing ethical principles, and then come up with a reasoned response. Regarding the issue of gender reassignment, this article provoked me, fascinated me, and confused me simultaneously. The literature was oppositional, experts in the field disagreed, the popular press accounts were sensationalizing. I began to dread writing the response for fear of publishing an inaccurate or incorrect response. Ethics training teaches us to ask the basic moral questions: "What is the good?" and "How do we know?". This commentary is offered with uncertainty, stating what I think may be the good and how I think I know.
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