identity

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Reteaching Gender and Sexuality

Reteaching Gender & Sexuality is a message about queer youth action and resilience. The video was generated to contribute additional queer/trans youth voices to the national conversations about queer/trans youth lives. 

Reteaching Gender & Sexuality intends to steer the conversation beyond the symptom of bullying, to consider systemic issues and deeper beliefs about gender and sexuality that impact queer youth.  We invite you to share the video with your friends, family and networks; we invite you to share with us what THIS issue means to you!

Reteaching Gender and Sexuality from Sid Jordan on Vimeo.

 

For more info go to putthisonthemap.org.

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Transgender Day of Remembrance

Twelfth Annual International Transgender Day of Remembrance.

November 20, 2010

I really don't look forward to this day at all. 

I dread the emotional impact of realizing the toll in human lives that sexism and misogyny take out as measured in human lives. 

I don't want to think about people being killed because of their identity.

I cannot stand thinking about the lies, gloating, pride, vanity, bullying, cruelty and inhumanity behind each death blow.

I am angered by the willingess of juries and judges to allow murderers to go free because of "trans panic" or some other abominable story about why killing someone is acceptable because of the murderers ignorant, hate-filled judgments.

I feel helpless against the millions of deaf ears and thoughtless insults that it takes to bring about the change in law, religion, culture and family that is needed for human beings to be accepted as the gender they know themselves to be.

But, I am alive and I have the chance to help end all of this that I abhor and dread.  So, I do not forget and I do not remain silent, because silence is murder. 

So, I remember and I speak out and I ask that you do the same.

-arvan

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Call for Submissions: Why Are Faggots So Afraid Of Faggots?

WHY ARE FAGGOTS SO AFRAID OF FAGGOTS?: flaming challenges to masculinity, objectification and the desire to conform

As back rooms are shut down to make way for wedding vows, and gay sexual culture becomes little more than straight-acting dudes hangin’ out, where are the possibilities for a defiant faggotry that challenges the assimilationist norms of a world that wants us dead? 

Masculine ideals have long reigned supreme in male sexual spaces, from the locker room to the tea room, the bars to the back alleys to the beaches.  But is there something more brutal and dehumanizing about the calculated hyperobjectification of the internet? How do we confront the limits of transaction sexuality, where scorn becomes “just a preference,” lack of respect is assumed, and lying is a given? How can we create something splendid and intimate from that universe of shaking and moaning and nervous glances turned inward now groaning?

I’m especially interested in essays about community-building experiments, public sexual cultures, faggots not socialized or presenting as male, cruising, HIV, consumerism, transfaggotry, polyamory, feminism, sexual safety and risk-taking, norms for faggots outside of the US, and gender transgression (of course).  I’m looking for essays that expose hierarchies of gender, age, race, nationality, class, body type, ability, sexuality and other identity categories instead of imposing fascistic definitions based on beauty myth consumer norms. That’s right, honey — I’m talking about interventions that are dangerous and lovely, just like you. 

The basics:

The official deadline has passed, but if you have something you think is urgently needed in the book, please contact Mattilda.

Send submissions to:

Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore

537 Jones Street, #3152

San Francisco, CA 94102

(h/t iragray)

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Call for Submissions: Perverts Of Color

(h/t Sex in the Public Square)

pervert:

vb - to lead into deviant beliefs or behaviour; to corrupt.

n - a person who practises sexual perversion. 

person of color:

n - is a term used, primarily in the United States, to describe all people who are not white. The term is meant to be inclusive among non-white groups, emphasizing common experiences of racism. 'People of color' was introduced as a preferrable replacement to both non-white and minority, which are also inclusive, because it frames the subject positively; non-white defines people in terms of what they are not (white), and minority frequently carries a subordinate connotation.

Mission Statement

The Perverts of Color anthology is a collection of voices from people of color (POCs) who participate in alternative sexual and relationship practices which include but are not limited to: S&M, D/s, leather, kink, fetishism, polyamory, and swinging. “Pervert” is a term that society projects onto our bodies and our desires. We use “pervert” both to acknowledge the rejection and stereotyping we face, and to redefine the word on our own terms.

Our Intent

a) celebrate the experiences of US racial/ethnic minorities navigating alternative sexualities;

b) recover hidden histories and recognize the contributions of POCs to alternative sexuality rights and culture;

c) share stories about ways POCs have resisted dominant narratives about their sexuality; and

d) create possibilities for coalition and resistance for kinky POCs.

Call for Submissions

The voices of US racial minorities in alternative sexual communities are important but often unheard. If you are a POC who has been or is involved in the kink/poly community, the Perverts of Color anthology needs to hear your story.

Click here for writing prompts and ideas.

We are accepting non-fiction essays (1,500-5,000 words) related to the theme of the intersection of race and alternative sexual practices. New authors are welcome. Fiction, erotica, and poetry are not accepted. The Perverts of Color anthology is intended as a multi-ethnic, multi-racial collection, so we encourage all POCs to submit their stories. We invite POCs of all genders, ages, religions/spiritualities, sexual orientations and socio-economic backgrounds. Authors may use a pen name in order to maintain anonymity. All authors will keep the copyright to their submission, have a printed biography, and receive one copy of the completed book.

Now accepting submissions until December 15th 2010!

Contact Us

If you are interested, email us at pervertsofcolor@gmail.com with a one-paragraph summary of your essay (250 words maximum) and a short bio (250 words maximum). All submission summaries are due by December 15th at 12 midnight (Eastern Standard Time). We will contact authors individually to express interest in a complete submission.

What made you decide to create this anthology?

We are longtime kinksters, community members, and political types whose frustration with the racism experienced in the organized kink community - and with the kink-aversion in our other racial communities - got us thinking and talking to each other (and anyone who would listen) about the connections between our racial and sexual identities. This anthology is a way for us to start larger discussions on the topic with voices of all kinds.

Who are they?

Jaki is a genderqueer Black American Leather feminist with a passion for alternative sexuality and getting off. Jaki has begun a one-person campaign to promote "yo" as a gender neutral option because it is fun and original. Yo has always been interested in writing for the underdogs. This passion has lead to minority studies in many flavors which ultimately lead to the BDSM/Leather Community. Jaki sought a book about the intesection of race and radical sexuality and when it didn't exist, yo decided to create it.

Katie is a queer, biracial Korean American kinkster with experience in grassroots activism around racism and violence against women of color. She has been involved in the DC kink community since 2003 and has identified as polyamorous ever since she discovered a word for it in college.

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Columbia College Chicago presents Tomboy

Columbia College Chicago presents Tomboy

Columbia College Chicago November 8, 2010 – January 7, 2011

Glass Curtain Gallery,

Columbia College Chicago

1104 S Wabash Avenue, 1st floor,

Chicago, IL 60605

Gallery Hours: Mon-Wed, Fri, 9-5pm,

Thurs 9-7pm, Sat Noon-5pm

http://www.colum.edu/deps

Reception with curator and artists: November 11, 2010, 5-8pm

Opening Night Programming:

Artist Performances include Indoor 5k, run with Mary George, 4:30-6:30pm

and I Will Always Love You, interactive performance by Allison Halter, 5:30pm

Accompanying Lecture

“Crossing the Line: Genre & Identity,” a reading and lecture by award-winning author Dorothy Allison, 7:30pm in the Conaway Center adjacent to the Glass Curtain Gallery

Additional Programming:

Cafe Society, a year-long series featuring several Columbia College exhibitions, welcomes the Columbia community and the public for a salon style discussion of Tomboy. November 16, 4:00-6:00pm in the Glass Curtain Gallery.

Tomboy examines the degrees to which identity and gender influence meaning in the work of six contemporary queer women artists.  From painterly gestures to performative acts, sculptural installations to digitally altered photographs, this exhibition explores the variety of approaches artists take in negotiating notions of identity.  These works turn away from the essentialism of early feminist art and the specificity of “identity art,” and instead employ identity in intentionally ambiguous, mercurial, and peripheral ways.  Tomboy delves into the murky spaces between the personal, the political, and the formal in order to ask viewers the question: “can and should what we know about an artist be separated from how we experience their work?”

Participating Artists:

Kelli Connell

Dana DeGiulio

Daphne Fitzpatrick

Mary George

Allison Halter

Leeza Meksin

Tomboy is curated by Betsy Odom

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:

Visit the Department of Exhibition and Performance Spaces webpage: http://www.colum.edu/deps

CONTACT

Exhibition information: Mark Porter, mporter@colum.edu

Press inquiries: Elizabeth Burke-Dain, eburkedain@colum.edu

This program is produced by the Department of Exhibition and Performance Spaces of Columbia College Chicago.

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Islamic Legal Tradition and Feminism: Opening a New Dialogue

Author: Ziba Mir-Hosseini (via SKSW)

Publication Date: October, 2010

(This paper was presented at the IV International Congress on Islamic Feminism in Madrid, 21-24 October 2010)

I am delighted to be here, and I would like to thank the organizers, in particular Abdennur Prado, for inviting me to the Fourth Congress on Islamic Feminism. I am sorry that my co-panelist compatriot, Ms Fariba Alasvand, whose scholarship and writings I have been following from afar for some time, was not able to be here. I am grateful to Mr Joaquin Rodriguez for presenting her paper.

The term ‘Islamic Feminism’ gained currency in the 1990s as a label for a brand of feminist scholarship and activism that was associated with Islam and Muslims. I was among the first scholars to use the term to speak of a new gender consciousness that emerged in Iran in the early 1990s, a decade after the 1979 popular revolution that led to a merger of religious and political power in the country. There has since been much discussion and debate and a growing literature on ‘Islamic feminism’, to which I have contributed. Inevitably, there are diverging accounts of the nature of this phenomenon, and of its origins and development.[1] Here I want to revisit this term and offer some reflections on the heavy political baggage that comes with it—as well as with its component elements: ‘Islamic’ and ‘feminism’.

I have two objectives. First, I want to set the record straight and to explain the context in which I have used the term myself, and the kind of feminism that is involved. I shall reflect on the term in the light of developments in the intervening years, culminating in two events in 2009 that, I believe, show how far the debate has moved on, both globally and locally, namely, first, the launch of Musawah, a ‘Global Movement for Equality and Justice in the Muslim Family’, and secondly, the emergence of the Green Movement in Iran. Musawah, launched in Kuala Lumpur in February 2009, brings Islamic and human rights frameworks together to build an overlapping consensus among Muslim women from diverse backgrounds and perspectives, and to push for legal reform.[2] The Green Movement in Iran started in June last year as a protest against a fraudulent presidential election, but it soon became a broader civil rights movement in which Iranian women have been the most prominent actors.[3]

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From Dakar ... with love

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    Feminist Responses towards Fundamentalisms and Neo-liberal Economy

    This is the final installment of a six-part series, orignally posted at e-Bangladesh.  

    Last Episode

    Discussion and Conclusion

    Asian feminists’ problems are somehow different from that of western societies. The nature of their problem may be understood from an advertisement that Othman (2006) mentioned in the context of Malaysia. An advertisement (in Malay) on all local TV stations in 2003 portrayed a veiled beautiful Muslim Malay woman who in order to ‘please her husband’ groomed her hair with the shampoo being advertised. The advertisement never showed her unveiled head, only a frame of her husband supposedly admiring her beautiful recently shampooed hair! What could be a better metaphor than this advertisement to portray the combined attack of corporate capital and religious fundamentalism in one female body!

    Throughout literature, the rise of religious fundamentalisms has been portrayed as the reaction to the failure of capitalist democracy. Mernissi (1989) argues that the spread of fundamentalism in the last two decades has stemmed from the political and social failures of the secular, authoritarian states of the post-colonial period, states that operate within the rules of the International Monetary Fund and the interests of the imperialist powers.  Again, feminism has been seen as the response to fundamentalism. Taking either side, i.e., fundamentalist side or corporate capital side, may prove to be fatal.

    We need to consider that religious fundamentalisms are in rise in this region with help from rightist political parties in power who support unconditional foreign investment in most of the countries and women lack not only human capital but social capital too. Also their access to political power is limited though many countries of this region are headed by women with almost no impact on women’s life. This cast further insight that women’s participation in democratic process is important but more important is to understand what political agenda they are advocating for. A note of caution here is, almost all the renowned women leaders of this region are in politics by inheritance, either of their father’s or husband’s. They just carry out the patriarchal agenda set by the concerned political parties and do not want to loose their vote taking any pro-women action that might hostile the religious fundamentalism unless they have pressures from  foreign donor agencies.

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    New Film from LGBTCentreMongolia: Tsenher tengeriin tsaana

    Created as part of an exhibition at the Mongolian National Modern Art Museum, Behind The Blue Sky depicts an unmentionable love between two Mongolian boys - one from the capital city of Ulaanbaatar, and the other, a nomadic herder from the countryside.

    To protect the identities of the Mongolian actors, their faces are obscured by a khadag, a traditional blue scarf.

    Created by Sean Devaney & Brandt Miller
    .

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    Pinocchio has gender issues

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