lgbtqi

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Call for Submissions: Trans Artist/Performers and Filmmakers

Attention all Trans Artist/Performers and FILMMAKERS!

Transgiving is looking for trans Film makers to submit their film work to be shown at the next Transgiving Film festival on August 28th 2010!

Their film festival last year was a huge success and had a packed theater, so they have decided to continue the Transgiving Film Festival. But they need your help!

They are currently looking for new films to be shown at the next film festival.  They are looking for all kinds of different films!

Are you interested?

CLICK HERE to go to the submission page!

While you are here, check out the video from last years film festival's Q & A panel:

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TheCall Ministries From USA Intends To Fuel Homophobia In Uganda

[via IGLHRC]

Urgent Call To Action: Stop Thecall Ministries From Fueling Homophobia In Uganda Through Their May 2, 2010, Crusade

Sexual Minorities Uganda (SMUG) condemns Lou Engle's upcoming crusade scheduled for May 2, 2010. The crusade could cause incalculable damage, as it is designed to label homosexuality as a "vice" in Uganda and to incite people to "fight" against this "vice" in society. In the context of an already inflamed extremist religious movement against homosexuality in Uganda sparked off by American evangelicals, the inflammatory preaching of Lou Engle and his associates is likely to incite further violence against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex (LGBTI) people in Uganda.

Sexual Minorities Uganda calls on all human rights defenders, organizations, religious communities and leaders, governments, and civil society, globally to take action to ensure that Lou Engle and his associates do not set foot in Uganda and that the Call Uganda does not proceed with this inflammatory and hate-inducing plan. While Sexual Minorities Uganda supports freedom of worship, we recognize the need for restriction on any speech that incites hatred and violence against a minority group. If a prayer event is to be held in Uganda, it should be done in a manner which encourages Christ-like love and acceptance and does not incite hatred and violence toward lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex people.

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Words That are Transphobic and Why

Transphobia: A reaction of fear, loathing, and discriminatory treatment of people whose identity or gender presentation (or perceived gender or gender identity) does not “match,” in the societally accepted way, the sex they were assigned at birth. Transgendered people, intersex people, lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, and other non-monosexuals are typically the target of transphobia.

Click here to download the Words That are Transphobic and Why poster. Feel free to print and display it in your office, classroom, or room to remind everyone to be more conscientious of the words we use in our everyday interactions.

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Trans Bodies, Trans Selves - Call for Contributions

Project Overview

Trans Bodies, Trans Selves is a resource guide for the transgender population, covering health, legal issues, cultural and social questions, history, theory, and more. It is a place for transgender and gender-questioning people, their partners and families, students, professors, guidance counselors, and others to look for up-to-date information on transgender life. Each chapter will be written by a separate transgender or genderqueer author, but to provide consistency of layout, message and tone, authors will be given guidelines and will work closely with the editor. The book will be aimed at a general transgender and gender-questioning audience, and when using complicated language, will provide definitions and explanations.

The tone will be friendly and fun, and will promote trans-positive, feminist and genderqueer advocacy. Included in each section will be anonymous quotes from everyday transgender people, who will be interviewed and also surveyed electronically, so that their voices are heard throughout. Short opinion pieces and testimonials (1-2 pages long) will also be included in each chapter.  Finally, each chapter will contain references to resources such as books, movies, and organizations related to the chapter’s topic.

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Chilean Custody Decision Violated Lesbian Judge's Rights

By Daniela Estrada

SANTIAGO, Apr 9, 2010 (IPS) - The attorneys representing Chilean Judge Karen Atala, a lesbian who brought her case before the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights claiming discrimination in the loss of custody of her three daughters, accused the Chilean state of sending out "unequivocal" signals of a lack of will to implement the regional body's recommendations.

The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR), a Washington-based Organisation of American States (OAS) body, found that "the Chilean state violated Karen Atala's right to live free from discrimination," and issued recommendations.

But Supreme Court chief magistrate Milton Juica said Thursday that he would not join the working group proposed by the government to comply with the suggestions issued in February.

"The courts do not discriminate in any way," Juica said, referring to the case. "We are not going to take part in any working group."

Although the government of right-wing President Sebastián Piñera said it accepted the IACHR's recommendations, Juica's remarks are "an unequivocal signal of the state's lack of will" to live up to them, said Jorge Contesse, director of the private Diego Portales University's (UDP) human rights centre.

In a May 2004 decision, the Supreme Court stripped Atala of custody of her three daughters because she was living with her lesbian partner, Emma de Ramón, a history professor.

In so doing, the Court overturned the rulings of two lower courts that had granted her custody after she separated from her husband, who is also a judge.

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Survey For Southern Transgender Folks

This survey is intended for individuals who identify under the Trans umbrella who currently or once resided in the South. If this is not you, please exit and forward this on to a Southern friend.

Hi, my name is BT and I am a trans man of color who's a part of a Southern Regional LGBTQ organization called SONG [Southerners On New Ground] (www.southernersonnewground.org) and I am working to gather data that is reflective of the conditions and needs of trans people who currently reside (or lived for any period of time) in the South.

If you fit that criteria it would be greatly appreciated if you took a few minutes to answer the survey that asks 3 questions around conditions and ask for 3 solutions to address them. This information will be compiled in hopes of helping to amplify the voices of Southern trans people and coming up with either ONE main resonating issue or a few equal issues that could be presented in June to the USSF in Detroit (www.ussf2010.org) as a part of a People's Movement Assembly (PMA) where a larger discussion will take place across other social justice causes. This People's Movement Assembly works to let the forum know the concerns/needs/desires of trans people in the South and ask those in attendance and beyond to join US in the ongoing work towards the resolution(s) of the presented issue(s).

For purposes of this survey the Southeast states are: (Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Mississippi, Arkansas, Louisiana, Alabama, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Georgia and Florida)

The deadline to submit this survey is: May 10th, 2010.

Click here to take survey!.

You can help promote this cause by filling out the survey (if you fit the criteria) and passing it to others who also fit the criteria.

Email (http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/8TPC8PS) and add (Click here to take survey) friendly link to your FACEBOOK, web pages and other networks you might be a part of.

NOTE: This survey is totally anonymous, no names / email addresses are required. All demographic information is for the gathering of concrete data that gives us an idea to what our community looks like and is concerned about. You may provide your email address in any of the boxes below to obtain the decided action plan results from this survey. We assure you that we will not associate any names / email addresses with any comments & feedback shared on this survey unless we are given explicit permission to do so.

I thank you for your time.

Sincerely,

BT

(via TransTalk)

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Organisation Intersex International Position Statement on Genital Cutting

Organisation Intersex International Position Statement on Genital Cutting

Intersex refers to atypical internal and/or external anatomical sexual characteristics, where features usually regarded as male or female may be mixed to some degree. This is a naturally occurring variation in humans. From the late 1950's onwards, starting in the USA, intersex infants and children were increasingly subject to cosmetic surgeries intended to ensure that their genital appearance and internal gonads conformed to that usually expected for their assigned gender. This also tended to entail hormone treatments aimed at conforming them to those associated with being "male" or "female."

From the early 1990’s to the present day, hundreds of intersex adults have come forward to say that they regard these medical practices as being extremely harmful to them, both physically and psychologically. Despite this high level of dissatisfaction, there has been little follow-up of adults who were treated this way as children, so without any clear understanding of outcomes, there is no real evidence upon which to justify this approach. On the contrary, the little evidence there is suggests that physiologically, functional outcome is poor. A study conducted in England of intersex people who electively chose to undergo such surgery as adults revealed that the large majority were dissatisfied; treatments resulted in physical pain and diminished sexual response, and were not able to provide them with the sense of normalcy which they hoped for.

There is no evidence that intersex variations alone will negatively impact the quality of life of the individuals who have them, nor that "normalizing" medical treatments are a solution. What evidence there is suggests the opposite; intersex adults who have not received unnecessary medical intervention have said they feel lucky to have "escaped" such treatments. They lack the psychological trauma from treatments imposed on others, and report satisfaction with their sexual response and their unique physical attributes. Such treatment is often justified from the assumption that intersex children and/or adults will be subjected to discriminatory behaviour because of their bodily differences; however, this is not necessarily correct, because their differences are sometimes only evident when naked, or not evident visually at all. Where differences are visible, this is no different than the situation of people from other minority groups. The solution to such challenges is not to alter the characteristics themselves, but to combat the prejudicial attitudes that stigmatise.

Cosmetic surgery on intersex genitals appears to harm intersex infants, children, and even adults, yet it still persists. As with male circumcision, it is often driven by parental desire to provide their children with bodies that conform to certain beliefs about how genitals should be. Also, the presumption that atypical sex anatomy will result in atypical sexual orientation and/or gender identity, homophobia and a fear of atypical gender presentation are seen by some intersex people as the motivation driving these surgeries. In many societies today, gender expression and sexual orientation are seen as a human right, and this is recognised by the UN. Performing unnecessary surgeries on infants and children in order to influence adult sexual orientation and/or gender identity outcomes should be seen as a human rights abuse. There is no evidence that sexual orientation or gender identity are affected by genital surgery one way or the other.

We seek recognition that all humans have the right to autonomy over their own bodies, including their genitals etc. Because infants and children are too young to assert their autonomy, they should not be subjected to unnecessary surgeries which may irrevocably harm them, and which they may not have chosen as adults. We recognise that cases requiring medical treatment for the maintenance of health or preservation of life should be managed as with any other situation where a child needs treatment. Intersex infants and children should be raised without cosmetic surgery and/or steroidal hormones until they are old enough to decide for themselves whether they wish to undergo these procedures and treatments or not.

We recommend avoidance of genital cutting, where possible, until a child can fully participate in decision making. This would be worked towards through communication between parents of intersex children, the children themselves, intersex adults, support groups, and clinicians who are sensitive to the needs of the child. Counselling should be available for those affected by the situation, to ensure they are fully informed and equipped to make the best decisions. Wider education about intersex as a human variation is also necessary; the cultural anxiety and social pressure that encourage surgery, hormone therapy and physical conformity need to be addressed. Through a process that includes education, communication, and counselling, then public shame will decrease, along with a reduction of cultural anxiety and social pressure, ultimately allowing people the liberty to maintain autonomy over their own bodies.

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1st International Sex and/or Gender Diversity Day: 26 April

 

(via The Scavenger)

The first International Sex and/or Gender Diversity Day has been declared 26 April and will be an awareness day and celebration of the existence or sex and/or gender diverse people, writes Tracie O’Keefe.

Sex and/or gender diverse people are encouraged to have picnics, tea parties, festivals or gatherings in their part of the world, inviting their family, friends and allies to join them.

We will be visible in all our sex and/or gender variations. It is for all intersex, transexed, transsexual, transgendered, androgynous, without sex and gender identity, cross-dressers, sex and gender fluid, transqueers, genderqueers, etc.

It is a day to have a picnic, tea party, gathering or festival wherever you are. In my 1999 book Sex Gender and Sexuality: 21st Century Transformations my research calculated that at least 1% of the world’s population is sex and/or gender diverse.

OK – so many of us who are sex and/or gender diverse are scary to the masses because we are out there being visible, but the majority are stealth, invisible and often live with shame thrust upon them by ignorance or trying to evade an over-controlling medicalisation of their identities and prejudice.

When I was 15, Kevin B, the boy I grew up next door to, told me his mother expressly did not want him speaking to me because she was afraid I was dangerous.

I did have very high hair, one-foot high platforms and more make-up and fashion accessories than most department stores, plus a boyfriend on one arm, girlfriend on the other and was registered at school as a boy – admittedly in 1970 that was probably a bit frightening to the public. I was never one for half measures.

Nowadays I’m more likely to shop in K-Mart and be found peering through a microscope. I don’t stick out in crowd (apart from my red hennaed hair), so I’m just your plain old intersex, transexed sort of girl. But the law still prevents me from having all the same rights as someone who was registered as their lived sex at birth.

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Call for Submissions: Montaging The Self.

Montaging the Self is a collaborative arts project using photography as the primary medium. This project is based solely on submissions of those who are interested in joining the project, whether stumbled upon or by word of mouth. Each photograph will have a picture of one, or two people in one instance, with tape across their mouth with one or more adjectives written on the tape. The adjectives are used to show how each person has “montaged” themselves for the better or worse, as they have grown as an individual. Please note that not all words will be in English, as the project encourages people to use the language most comfortably used.

The projected audience is GLBTQA people. GLBTQA people are often altering themselves physically, emotionally, or mentally, due to the effects of family, friends, society and the media. By taping the mouth there is some feel of censorship. This is done purposefully because many GLBTQA people have had to censor some part of their life.

I am currently working on the website, but need submissions NOW! If you are interested, I'd love to hear from you.

Please, join the project and spread the word to anyone you think would like to participate.

Send all photos and/or questions to: Montaging.The.Self@gmail.com

Become a fan on Facebook and follow them on Twitter
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Intersex as Identity: Movie screening and lecture at School of the Art Institute of Chicago

SAIC is presenting two events this week dealing with gender identity, one film and one lecture.  I spoke briefly with Quiana Carter at the SAIC about these events.  The come about as an extension of the school's commitment to addressing the topic of gender per discussions with by students and faculty.  These events are open to all, as the school is looking to create an open dialogue in exploring gender and society.

XXY
Monday, April 12, 6 p.m.
SAIC Auditorium, 280 S. Columbus Dr.
Free Screening

Directed by Lucía Puenzo, this 91-minute feature tackles issues facing 15 year-old Alex (Inés Efron), who was born an intersex child. XXY (2007) was Argentina's official entry for the Best Foreign Language Film category at the 2008 Academy Awards. Sponsored by the Office of Multicultural Affairs

Exs & Whys a presentation by Jen Pagonis
Tuesday, April 13, 6 p.m.
SAIC Auditorium, 280 S. Columbus Dr.
Free

A recent graduate of DePaul University and a member of the The Intersex Collective Speakers Bureau, Jen Pagonis received her degree in Women's and Gender Studies and completed her thesis on the topic of intersexuality. Her thesis presentation included original research and interviews with intersex activists from the San Francisco bay and Chicago areas. She is currently working on creating a peer led intersex youth and parent group in the Chicago area. Her appearance follows the screening of XXY on April 12 (see Films and Screenings). Sponsored by the Office of Multicultural Affairs

For more information, contact:

Quiana Burwell
Multicultural Affairs Assistant Director
School of the Art Institute of Chicago
36 S. Wabash Ave, Suite 1203 J2

Ph: 312.629-6868
Fax: 312.629.6801

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