women's history

LaPrincipessa's picture

Work Place Inequality - From Top to Bottom, Companies Still Not Hiring Women

A new report from the Los Angeles Business Examiner reveals that corporations are seeing less and less women in boardrooms than ever before.  New studies published show that about 10% of executives are women.  The  study cited in this report shows that the demographic of these companies generally reflect the boardroom.  This is based on about 400 companies in California only.

The ranks of women in corporate executive suites and board rooms remain thin, even as research shows that companies with more women at the top perform better financially and might be more socially responsible.

That’s according to a study of California women business leaders released Thursday by the Graduate School of Management at the University of California Davis.

Women hold only about one out of every 10 top management and board positions — precisely 10.6 percent — in California’s largest 400 firms, according to the fifth annual Study of California Women Business Leaders.  That ratio has remained pretty consistent over the five years that the Graduate School has been studying the issue.

LaPrincipessa's picture

"If you talk, I'll kill you"

A very common trait of domestic violence is the threat by the abuser to inflict further physical harm in the event the victim talks about the abuse. This is part of the overall abuse cycle and is one of many reasons victims remain in abusive relationships, often times long after they have been physically assaulted.
 
Last week, Rihanna, who is a famous singer and was infamously beat up by her then boyfriend Chris Brown, spoke about the incident. She described the violence in detail and explained why she was photographed with her attacker after the abuse. She spoke candidly about her emotions and her feelings about her abuser. She revealed herself to be conflicted, insecure, devastated, strong and beautifully unashamed. All of which are normal reactions displayed by victims of domestic violence. To be brutalized by someone you so desperately love is very confusing and more damaging emotionally than many can imagine.
LaPrincipessa's picture

Under Don’t Ask Don’t Tell, Women More Likely To Be Expelled- AP

Go figure.

The AP reports:

SAN FRANCISCO — Pentagon statistics obtained by University of California researchers show that women are far more likely than men to be kicked out of the military under the "don't ask, don't tell policy" banning openly gay servicemembers.

Every military branch dismissed a disproportionate number of women in 2008 under the policy banning openly gay servicemembers. But the discrepancy was particularly marked in the Air Force, where women were a majority of those let go under the policy, even though they made up only 20 percent of personnel.

Across the military, women represented about one-third of the 619 people discharged based on sexual orientation. They account for just 15 percent of servicemembers.

The data was released Thursday by the Palm Center at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

With these statistics, it's doubly not surprising that the President considers his plate too full to deal with this, as Lesbian Women are like, one millionTH in line to get equal rights. Even with the tremendous strides the collective Women's Movements have made, when things like this come to the surface, the leader's response seem to be, "yeah sure, we'll get right on that". There seems to be so much yet to be accomplished.

-Sophia

LaPrincipessa's picture

Female Athletes: Their Appeal at the Box Office to be Tested

Does America really like the female athlete? Pop culture to the rescue! This weekend, I’m certain we'll find out.

Most sports, for women, are truncated versions of the male sport. I'm sure someone has written why female sports aren't as lucrative; why the allure of a female sup-ah-stah isn't there. For goodness sake, there's a multi-billion dollar business that is conducting it's Finals series right now; profiting big off the notion that this female version of that sport is feminism gold. They pretend this means men and women ballers are the same and equal: "Look a pro league for women! BE HAPPY BITCHES! LOOK WHAT OUR BOARD OF DIRECTORS DID FOR YOU!” But we know the true message is: "these chic's can hoop, but just not quite good enough". Most of us know that when a "women's" section of a male activity is created, separately, from the male version, this isn't equality, its sexism. So what happens when, using the stereotypical male sports-movie script, women are the athletes?

LaPrincipessa's picture

Women in the Military:Separate is not Equal

Do women in the military experience equality with no strings attached?  No. Do women in the military experience a thicker "glass ceiling" ?  Obviously.  Are military service men and women considered equal and allowed to participate in combat, missions and other duties without gender classifications subject to the typical gender roles derived of the current social construct?  No.

Are military officials trying to change this?

Yes.

Women have been officially in the military for more than one hundred years and have been aiding our country in unrecognized military roles for far longer than that.  In the early twentieth century, women were permitted to serve primarily in support services such as the Nurse Corps.  During the 70’s, women were finally allowed to serve on Navy ships as nurses or officers but continued to be barred from sailing on warships or fighting on the “front lines” in combat until the 1990's.

LaPrincipessa's picture

Why We Need Feminism Now

News articles of late have featured studies and statistics aimed at women’s happiness and women’s sexual drive; how to find spiritual fulfillment or turn a one night stand into a lasting bond. It seems everyone these days has advice to women on how to live and enjoy their respective sex lives. I suppose my way of approaching this subject is as liberal as possible: do what you want with whomever you so please as long as what you do is completely consensual. I do not believe we should be made to feel guilty for being promiscuous or taught to view sex as only a means to pro-create or get what we want. All in all, these publicized opinions, skewed statistics and archaic opinions damage the already shaky perception women have of sex, our own bodies, and ultimately our own selves.

What goes on in my bedroom is no one’s business but my own. Women’s bodies, our sexual activities, should not be up for national debate and discussion. Just as in every election cycle, women’s decision making abilities and personal health decisions are trashed in the name of the pandering tactic otherwise known as the pro-choice v. pro-life debate, so are women trashed when popular journalists and news outlets advise women on the right thing to do in their sex lives. We are degraded to something less than human; a subject to be bantered about within the political arena. We are entertainment and apparently guinea pigs (why do we really have sex? One study asks), and we have no way to defend ourselves.

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History: Woman now Top Army Drill Sargeant

The New York Times reports:

On Tuesday, the Army will make Command Sgt. Maj. Teresa L. King, 48, commandant of its drill sergeant school here. It is a first: No woman has run one of the Army’s rigorous schools for drill instructors

Sgt. Maj. Teresa King is a hard core, no nonsense prototypical drill sergeant. She is also a woman and African American, a descendent of share croppers. Her ascent is even more important because of Army consolidation; she will now run the entire training operation for the United States Army.

Famous for their Smokey Bear hats, booming voices and no-nonsense demeanors, those sergeants transform tens of thousands of raw recruits into soldiers each year. It is one of the backbone jobs of the military, and having a woman in charge underscores the expanding role of women in the Army’s leadership.

I find this development to be especially meaningful. Her demeanor, her rise to leadership and her humble beginnings make her story truly inspiring.

-Sophia

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