sex

arvan's picture

Blog Carnival Call for Posts: Healing Touch

If you can’t get to New York to see or perform in our monthly live event,  the Blog Carnival is a way for sex workers and their allies to participate in the Red Umbrella Diaries from afar. Every month, I do a carnival of pieces of writing on the upcoming event’s theme.

For the next event, which takes place on October 7, the theme is Healing Touch. Here’s a little something to get you started thinking:

People in the sex trades are usually seen as being in need of public health interventions: condoms, HIV testing, and psychological counseling. But there are also sex workers who fancy themselves to be healers and who consent to participating in the medical profession in order to teach health care professionals a thing or two.

Send me a piece that is up to 700 words long, and I’ll pick my favorite to read at the event – and of course then I’ll put the recording in the weekly Red Umbrella Diaries audio podcast. Your piece can be previously published on your own blog or elsewhere, or you can conceal your identity and email me a piece that you can’t put your name on. The themes can be interpreted all kinds of different ways, I love to see creativity. Send your links or text to stories@redumbrellaproject.com by September 21st.

Want to read past blog carnivals? Check them out here.

arvan's picture

Trans Domestic Abuse Research Report Launched

Although there has been some research published looking specifically at same-sex domestic abuse and the prevalence rate of domestic abuse for lesbians, gay men and (to a lesser extent)bisexual people, there has been no published research focussed solely on transgender people’s experiences of domestic abuse in the UK. General research estimates that 73 percent of transgender people have experienced transphobic harassment1 and the Scottish Transgender Alliance found that 46 percent of transgender respondents to their ‘Transgender Experiences in Scotland’ survey had experienced transphobic abuse within a domestic relationship.

The LGBT Domestic Abuse Project is funded by the Scottish Government to raise awareness and improve service responses to LGBT people who experience domestic abuse. The project is managed by LGBT Youth Scotland and focuses on the experiences of people of all ages.  The project is supported by a reference group of members from the Scottish Government’s Violence Against Women team, Scottish Women’s Aid, Stonewall Scotland, Women’s Support Project, Open Road, Equality Network and Scottish Transgender Alliance.

The Scottish Transgender Alliance is funded by the Scottish Government to raise awareness and improve transgender equality, rights and inclusion. The Scottish Transgender Alliance is managed by the Equality Network.

The LGBT Domestic Abuse Project and the Scottish Transgender Alliance have undertaken this research to investigate the ways in which transgender people experience domestic abuse and to help determine the specific needs of the transgender community when accessing services which provide support and advice to those experiencing domestic abuse. An additional focus of the research was to explore some of the barriers faced by transgender people experiencing domestic abuse when accessing mainstream domestic abuse services.

arvan's picture

"I Fought for This, But Not Just to Be a Housewife"

By Dalia Acosta

HAVANA, Sep 3, 2010 (IPS) - Mavi Susel, the first transsexual in Cuba to undergo sex reassignment surgery, back in 1988, has found herself trapped in the traditionally assigned gender role of a housewife.

"She is a woman imprisoned in that gender role," Marilyn Solaya, the Cuban filmmaker who made the documentary "En el cuerpo equivocado" (In the Wrong Body), told the press.

The film, which premiered in mid-August in Cuba, was produced with the support of the second edition of DOCTV Latinoamérica, the first regional programme to foment production and television broadcasting of Latin American documentaries.

The pioneering co-production programme is an alliance between national broadcasting authorities, public TV stations and independent producers from 14 Latin American countries, which provided funds, took part in production and ensured the broadcasting of the documentaries on 18 public TV stations.

The story of Susel, who underwent gender reassignment surgery on May 22, 1988, goes beyond the "complex and, above all, necessary" issue of transsexualism, to explore "the construction of gender" and the prevalence of the traditional role of women in Cuba, Solaya said.

Fatma Emam's picture

On Child Marriage

I am interested in the issue of Child marriage in Egypt for many reasons, first because of the huge scandal of Senator Ahmed Yerima, Nigerian Senator who " married" a 13 years old Egyptian girl and

lovemagician's picture

Pride Film Festival: Seeking Queer Film [Call for Submissions]

SEEKING QUEER FILM!

PRIDE, a Bloomington, Indiana film festival exploring a wide variety of issues and situations involving the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender communities, is seeking full-length and short films and videos for its 2011 festival held at the end of January. The films can be on any topic relating to a diverse range of gay, lesbian, bi-sexual and/or transgender issues.  The deadline for submissions is September 31st, 2010. The Midwest festival spans three days, with multiple showings at the historic Buskirk-Chumley Theater in downtown Bloomington.

Select filmmakers will be invited to attend the festival and speak about their work, and three awards will be given to the Audience Favorite, Jury Selection, and the Alfred C. Kinsey Prize winners.  The Alfred C. Kinsey Prize is given annually to a film that furthers our understanding of gender and sexuality, and the filmmaker is invited to submit a copy of the film to the Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender, and Reproduction, which is located at Indiana University in Bloomington.

PRIDE seeks films that express a range of viewpoints and feature many different personality types and situations, advocating community-wide attitudes of awareness, acceptance and appreciation of diversity. The goals of the festival are to strengthen the local community and celebrate artistic talent and achievement.

Film Requirements
The film must be recent: no entries of films produced prior to 2009, please.
Length:
            Short films – maximum 30 minutes
            Feature-length films – maximum 120 minutes
Submission Formats:
            DVD
Presentation Screening Formats:
            miniDV
            Beta SP
            DVD
Entry Fee: None

Deadline: Sept 31, 2010

You may submit your film by sending a DVD along with a document giving details of the film, including length, format, year of production and a short synopsis, to:

Buskirk-Chumley Theater
ATTN: PRIDE
P.O. Box 1323
Bloomington, IN 47402

For more information about PRIDE, please visit: www.pridefilmfestival.org

arvan's picture

“In Your Face And In The Trenches”: Southern Trans People Speak Out

Southerners On New Ground REPORT
250 Georgia Ave. Suite 201
Atlanta, GA 30317
Phone: 404.549.8628
Fax: 404.549.8642
www.southernersonnewground.org

Trans People Speak Out

Welcome to SONG’s report on our Southern Trans people’s Survey/People’s Movement Assembly. In concert with the US Social Forum, SONG set out to listen more deeply to our Trans base, membership and Trans Southerners living outside of the South. Listening campaigns have always been a core part of SONG’s strategy: prioritizing listening to marginalized and oppressed communities to honor them with hearing and dignity; analyze conditions; find patterns; and take action based on that information. (For more information on SONG and who we are, visit: www.southernersonnewground.org).

SONG was founded by Black and White Lesbians in 1993, and has worked (over its political evolution) on centering voices that have been marginalized; and that has meant taking concrete steps to not only include “Trans voices” but also create real processes that build power, leadership and self-determination for Trans people and gender non-conforming people in SONG. This work is one of our steps in that direction. It is a summary of stories and information, and it was anonymous. However, in the interest of giving the reader a direct relationship to the true voices of the people who shared with us, we include anonymous quotes throughout, wherever possible.

Who Answered the Survey

This survey was answered by 127 people who identified in the largest numbers as Transwomen, Transmen, and Gender Queer, as well as Two Spirit, Cross dresser, passable, Autogynephile, Non-op Transsexual, Women, and Men. The survey asked for information from Trans and Gender Non-conforming people who lived or have lived in the South.

arvan's picture

Short Film About Sex Workers in Myanmar

This film by the Asia Pacific Network of Sex Worker$ (APNSW) gives an inside look at issues facing sex workers in Myanmar, and tells some of the fascinating story of how sex workers have organised and responded to HIV and to claim their rights.


rabbitwhite's picture

Sex Journalism: Call for "Johns"

As a sex-positive, sex-journalist, I am working on a project about the clientel of sex workers. I am currently looking to interview men, women and people of all genders who have experience visiting sex-workers. I am pro-sex work, which will show through. I will of course, protect identities. Interviews over phone and e-mail are fine.

Contact me at rachelrabbitwhite@gmail.com

Here are the details about the project. Please, please, feel free to pass this along.

About the Article: Stories about sex-work seems to always focus on the sex worker. Even in sex-positive circles, talking about "john's" can elicit a collective cringe. Is it because we don't get the sex worker clientele's side of the story-- how they think and feel, how sex workers help them?
This is the story I want to tell through in depth interviews with some clientele of sex workers.." I would like to represent as varied an experience as possible. This is going to be a very in depth article or series of articles which will run on Alternet.org.

About the Writer: "As a sex-positive, sex-journalist I work to shatter fears, stereotypes and defenses around sex (kinks included.) I find the veritable rainbow of consensual sex among adults valuable, and think there is a lot we can all learn from exploring that spectrum. As a sex-positive person my tone is never judgmental or snarky. My goal is for the readers to become more accepting of sexuality and to get curious about the world around them. I'll be covering things outside the norm but the idea isn't to present a novel sex act in order to entertain or shock. The idea is to challenge the way we think about sex, intimacy and relationships. To incite thought on the topic of sex."

 

To learn more about me, visit my personal blog at www.rabbitwrite.com

Clarisse Thorn's picture

[litquote] “Allowed to feel horny and fucked-up at the same time”

Originally posted at Clarisse Thorn: Pro-Sex Outreach, Open-Minded Feminism

I’ve had some wrenching personal decisions and transitions lately, and it put me in mind of other times in my life when I felt in flux. I love this quotation from Nick Hornby’s High Fidelity, which I first took down when I was coming into my BDSM identity.

I wake up around dawn, and I have the same feeling I had the other night, the night I caught on about Laura and Ray: that I’ve got no ballast, nothing to weigh me down, and if I don’t hang on, I’ll just float away. I like Marie a lot, she’s funny and smart and pretty and talented, but who the hell is she? I don’t mean that philosophically. I just mean, I don’t know her from Eve, so what am I doing in her bed? Surely there’s a better, safer, more friendly place for me than this? But I know there isn’t, not at the moment, and that scares me rigid.

I get up, find my snazzy boxers and my T-shirt, go into the living room, fumble in my jacket pocket for my fags and sit in the dark smoking. After a little while Marie gets up, too, and sits down next to me.

“You sitting here wondering what you’re doing?”

“No. I’m just, you know ….”

“‘Cause that’s why I’m sitting here, if it helps.”

“I thought I’d woken you up.”

“I ain’t even been to sleep yet.”

“So you’ve been wondering for a lot longer than me. Worked anything out?”

“Bits. I’ve worked out that I was real lonely, and I went and jumped into bed with the first person who’d have me. And I’ve also worked out that I was lucky it was you, and not somebody mean, or boring, or crazy.”

“I’m not mean, anyway. And you wouldn’t have gone to bed with anyone who was any of those things.”

“I’m not so sure about that. I’ve had a bad week.”

“What’s happened?”

“Nothing’s happened. I’ve had a bad week in my head, is all.”

Before we slept together, there was at least some pretense that it was something we both wanted to do, that it was the healthy, strong beginning of an exciting new relationship. Now all the pretense seems to have gone, and we’re left to face the fact that we’re sitting here because we don’t know anybody else we could be sitting with.

“I don’t care if you’ve got the blues,” Marie says. “It’s OK. And I wasn’t fooled by you acting all cool about … what’s her name?”

“Laura.”

“Laura, right. But people are allowed to feel horny and fucked-up at the same time. You shouldn’t feel embarrassed about it. I don’t. Why should we be denied basic human rights just because we’ve messed up our relationships?”

I’m beginning to feel more embarrassed about the conversation than about anything we’ve just done. Horny? They really use that word? Jesus. All my life I’ve wanted to go to bed with an American, and now I have, and I’m beginning to see why people don’t do it more often. Apart from Americans, that is, who probably go to bed with Americans all the time.

Why do I love it? I love it because it simultaneously acknowledges that sex can be awkward and weird and intersect with negative emotions, and then deftly points out that this isn’t a problem or argument against sexuality in itself.

Also, I can’t help noting that the only guys I’ve hooked up with who seriously used the word “horny” were British.

(This passage is from the book, not the movie. Alas, the movie version of this scene wasn’t nearly as good.)

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