gender

arvan's picture

Meeting my Dad as his Daughter (trans woman) - Personal Vlog by ladyVixion

ladyVixion is one of the most touching, open and honest people I've come across.  In this personal vlog entry, she describes her experience in meeting her father for the first time in person, since she came out as trans to him. 

With all the crap going on in this world, the beauty of human relatedness and the example of how we can profoundly impact each other - is cause for hope, strength and courage.

-arvan

arvan's picture

Blog Carnival Call for Posts: Healing Touch

If you can’t get to New York to see or perform in our monthly live event,  the Blog Carnival is a way for sex workers and their allies to participate in the Red Umbrella Diaries from afar. Every month, I do a carnival of pieces of writing on the upcoming event’s theme.

For the next event, which takes place on October 7, the theme is Healing Touch. Here’s a little something to get you started thinking:

People in the sex trades are usually seen as being in need of public health interventions: condoms, HIV testing, and psychological counseling. But there are also sex workers who fancy themselves to be healers and who consent to participating in the medical profession in order to teach health care professionals a thing or two.

Send me a piece that is up to 700 words long, and I’ll pick my favorite to read at the event – and of course then I’ll put the recording in the weekly Red Umbrella Diaries audio podcast. Your piece can be previously published on your own blog or elsewhere, or you can conceal your identity and email me a piece that you can’t put your name on. The themes can be interpreted all kinds of different ways, I love to see creativity. Send your links or text to stories@redumbrellaproject.com by September 21st.

Want to read past blog carnivals? Check them out here.

arvan's picture

Call for Papers: (re)Branding Feminism

(RE)BRANDING FEMINISM

A conference hosted by the Institute of Germanic & Romance Studies (IGRS), Stewart House, 32 Russell Square, London, WC1B 5ND.
1st -2nd March 2011.

Call for Papers:

There has been a general recognition, if not acceptance, of many of feminism’s key concepts.  But does this mean that it has ceased to assert itself as a unique movement?  Indeed, should feminism be (re)branded in an age when all ideologies are subject to market forces?  And what should this rebranding consist of?

Two years on from the stimulating ‘Where are we now?  A workshop on women and heterosexuality’ hosted by the IGRS, this conference will address some of the issues raised then to question the place of feminism in the twenty-first century.  While there has been ambivalent press and general apathy towards those issues that once encouraged women to put the political into the personal, it is increasingly women themselves who think there is nothing more to discuss.  Why has there been a decline in the link between the personal and the ideological?  Do we need a different kind of feminism to meet the cultural, political and academic needs of a younger generation?

Topics might include but are not limited to:

• Are sisters doing it for themselves?


• Feminism on the frontline


• I can be a real bitch 


• Family romances


• Home-makers and career women 


• God was/is a woman


• Feminism and the sex industry


• Feminist renaissance 


• Feminism is bollocks


• Rebranding feminism


• Pub talk

Abstracts between 200-300 words that explore any aspect of (re)branding feminism are sought as are poster submissions of 200 - 300 words on any topic related to rebranding feminism. Submit poster ideas and abstracts in a word document or .pdf.

Please send abstracts and poster ideas to both Jean Owen (ojean27@yahoo.com) and Elisha Foust (elishafoust@googlemail.com) by 5pm 1 October 2010

arvan's picture

Trans Domestic Abuse Research Report Launched

Although there has been some research published looking specifically at same-sex domestic abuse and the prevalence rate of domestic abuse for lesbians, gay men and (to a lesser extent)bisexual people, there has been no published research focussed solely on transgender people’s experiences of domestic abuse in the UK. General research estimates that 73 percent of transgender people have experienced transphobic harassment1 and the Scottish Transgender Alliance found that 46 percent of transgender respondents to their ‘Transgender Experiences in Scotland’ survey had experienced transphobic abuse within a domestic relationship.

The LGBT Domestic Abuse Project is funded by the Scottish Government to raise awareness and improve service responses to LGBT people who experience domestic abuse. The project is managed by LGBT Youth Scotland and focuses on the experiences of people of all ages.  The project is supported by a reference group of members from the Scottish Government’s Violence Against Women team, Scottish Women’s Aid, Stonewall Scotland, Women’s Support Project, Open Road, Equality Network and Scottish Transgender Alliance.

The Scottish Transgender Alliance is funded by the Scottish Government to raise awareness and improve transgender equality, rights and inclusion. The Scottish Transgender Alliance is managed by the Equality Network.

The LGBT Domestic Abuse Project and the Scottish Transgender Alliance have undertaken this research to investigate the ways in which transgender people experience domestic abuse and to help determine the specific needs of the transgender community when accessing services which provide support and advice to those experiencing domestic abuse. An additional focus of the research was to explore some of the barriers faced by transgender people experiencing domestic abuse when accessing mainstream domestic abuse services.

arvan's picture

"I Fought for This, But Not Just to Be a Housewife"

By Dalia Acosta

HAVANA, Sep 3, 2010 (IPS) - Mavi Susel, the first transsexual in Cuba to undergo sex reassignment surgery, back in 1988, has found herself trapped in the traditionally assigned gender role of a housewife.

"She is a woman imprisoned in that gender role," Marilyn Solaya, the Cuban filmmaker who made the documentary "En el cuerpo equivocado" (In the Wrong Body), told the press.

The film, which premiered in mid-August in Cuba, was produced with the support of the second edition of DOCTV Latinoamérica, the first regional programme to foment production and television broadcasting of Latin American documentaries.

The pioneering co-production programme is an alliance between national broadcasting authorities, public TV stations and independent producers from 14 Latin American countries, which provided funds, took part in production and ensured the broadcasting of the documentaries on 18 public TV stations.

The story of Susel, who underwent gender reassignment surgery on May 22, 1988, goes beyond the "complex and, above all, necessary" issue of transsexualism, to explore "the construction of gender" and the prevalence of the traditional role of women in Cuba, Solaya said.

arvan's picture

Photo exhibition reviles violence against women

By Nathan Kiwere | The Independent

Pain, agony, anguish, torment described the recently concluded photo exhibition at the AU Summit and Nommo gallery. If there were ever any observers with misgivings about the ability of a picture to speak a thousand words, as the age-old adage goes, their doubts were assuaged by the power of the black and white pictures that carried heavy emotive messages. Women took turns to echo their displeasure about the vice of violence against women, invoking strong language during the opening of the photo show at Nommo gallery. But did their message capture the attention it deserved?

The exhibition was organized under the auspices of the framework of the Year of Peace and Security (YoPS) in Africa and the the African Union (AU) in partnership with the United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM) during its 15th AU Summit at Munyonyo Resort. It comprised of pictures that aim to raise awareness on the ruthless reality faced by women in armed conflict situations, emphasizing the serious repercussions these women then face in their communities. The display conveyed the message that peace is only possible by ending violence against women and girls. The 30 images composed the five sections of the exhibition, starting with an overview of armed conflict, followed by the various forms of gender based violence and the reasons why women and girls are particularly vulnerable in conflict and post conflict situations. The exhibition also displayed the strategies that have been developed to tackle this issue.

lovemagician's picture

Pride Film Festival: Seeking Queer Film [Call for Submissions]

SEEKING QUEER FILM!

PRIDE, a Bloomington, Indiana film festival exploring a wide variety of issues and situations involving the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender communities, is seeking full-length and short films and videos for its 2011 festival held at the end of January. The films can be on any topic relating to a diverse range of gay, lesbian, bi-sexual and/or transgender issues.  The deadline for submissions is September 31st, 2010. The Midwest festival spans three days, with multiple showings at the historic Buskirk-Chumley Theater in downtown Bloomington.

Select filmmakers will be invited to attend the festival and speak about their work, and three awards will be given to the Audience Favorite, Jury Selection, and the Alfred C. Kinsey Prize winners.  The Alfred C. Kinsey Prize is given annually to a film that furthers our understanding of gender and sexuality, and the filmmaker is invited to submit a copy of the film to the Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender, and Reproduction, which is located at Indiana University in Bloomington.

PRIDE seeks films that express a range of viewpoints and feature many different personality types and situations, advocating community-wide attitudes of awareness, acceptance and appreciation of diversity. The goals of the festival are to strengthen the local community and celebrate artistic talent and achievement.

Film Requirements
The film must be recent: no entries of films produced prior to 2009, please.
Length:
            Short films – maximum 30 minutes
            Feature-length films – maximum 120 minutes
Submission Formats:
            DVD
Presentation Screening Formats:
            miniDV
            Beta SP
            DVD
Entry Fee: None

Deadline: Sept 31, 2010

You may submit your film by sending a DVD along with a document giving details of the film, including length, format, year of production and a short synopsis, to:

Buskirk-Chumley Theater
ATTN: PRIDE
P.O. Box 1323
Bloomington, IN 47402

For more information about PRIDE, please visit: www.pridefilmfestival.org

arvan's picture

"Wife"

I took my 8 y/o daughter recently to visit the grave of my grandmother and grandfather.  They're buried in a little cemetery in Batavia, IL called Resurrection.  My daughter said it was too bad that we didn't bring flowers and I agreed.  I'm not much of a cemetery visitor myself, but there is something about flowers.

We agreed to bring flowers next time.

It took us about 20 minutes to find the headstones, which was comedic in itself.  I was sort of embarrassed that I didn't know where the markers were.  I mean, I really did spend a lot of time with "Gramma" when she was alive.  I haven't visited her grave since the day she was buried, 9 years ago.

As I lined up an 8 y/0 child with me into a search party for two rocks in the ground with names Donald andJane, I thought that it's probably a lucky break for me that I am an atheist.  I figured that if I believed that I'd be facing the spirits of the dead in an afterlife, they would chew my ass out for never visiting their tombs or at least bringing flowers when I did finally swing by.  Not to mention spending my remaining living years stewing over the guilt for my misdeeds.

As it was, I just passed the time watching my daughter pick up shiny things as an offering for the graves of her ancestors.  I wondered if I was a poor example of how to respect ones ancestors, but that was just my old Catholic guilt training flaring up like some scar from a childhood trauma.  In reality, the way to respect my ancestors is to live a life of dignity and honesty; to live a life worth living.  That's what they did and that's the only thing Gramma would want me to do, if she were here.  It's all she ever wanted for me.

arvan's picture

“In Your Face And In The Trenches”: Southern Trans People Speak Out

Southerners On New Ground REPORT
250 Georgia Ave. Suite 201
Atlanta, GA 30317
Phone: 404.549.8628
Fax: 404.549.8642
www.southernersonnewground.org

Trans People Speak Out

Welcome to SONG’s report on our Southern Trans people’s Survey/People’s Movement Assembly. In concert with the US Social Forum, SONG set out to listen more deeply to our Trans base, membership and Trans Southerners living outside of the South. Listening campaigns have always been a core part of SONG’s strategy: prioritizing listening to marginalized and oppressed communities to honor them with hearing and dignity; analyze conditions; find patterns; and take action based on that information. (For more information on SONG and who we are, visit: www.southernersonnewground.org).

SONG was founded by Black and White Lesbians in 1993, and has worked (over its political evolution) on centering voices that have been marginalized; and that has meant taking concrete steps to not only include “Trans voices” but also create real processes that build power, leadership and self-determination for Trans people and gender non-conforming people in SONG. This work is one of our steps in that direction. It is a summary of stories and information, and it was anonymous. However, in the interest of giving the reader a direct relationship to the true voices of the people who shared with us, we include anonymous quotes throughout, wherever possible.

Who Answered the Survey

This survey was answered by 127 people who identified in the largest numbers as Transwomen, Transmen, and Gender Queer, as well as Two Spirit, Cross dresser, passable, Autogynephile, Non-op Transsexual, Women, and Men. The survey asked for information from Trans and Gender Non-conforming people who lived or have lived in the South.

Syndicate content
Powered by Drupal, an open source content management system